Picking a Juniper species/cultivar for Phoenix Graft Tanuki

Rivka

Shohin
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I am now pondering what type of juniper to use? Two main considerations, some I just personally like better (blue types over green ones for instance) and I would think it important to use one with a similar growth style as the deadwood I’m working with, which was likely a Juniperus squamata, but who knows.
It’s a large piece, and kind of a windswept or semi cascade is likely to happen, so a type that extends well.
I would like something that does not tear my hands up for the rest of eternity, so hopefully stay away from the nastiest of the needle types.
Suggestions?

84FCF438-AAF4-4ED5-AA1B-3E2AEB167960.jpegBE4B7EA4-A298-461D-8C34-56E3B564C533.jpeg?
 

HENDO

Shohin
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Really cool piece!!!

I've only worked with Procumbens for Phoenix Graft and it has been a breeze. Seem some very nice Shimpaku examples though and that would be my first choice for the next one.

If you can source some 1-3 whips now and grow them out as long and leggy as possible throughout the season to be ready for work in the Winter you'll be all set. Keep em' less than half inch diameter maximum so you don't have to crank on them too hard around those nice bends on the deadwood.
 

Rivka

Shohin
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Yeah I think whatever life type I pick, I’ll do exactly that, and play with a few for a year and do some test pieces with less precious deadwood. (I saved some sections i cut off of this to sample with as well)
Meanwhile will let my deadwood benefit from some natural weathering for a year at least. Once I finish prepping it and securing it in its intended orientation, I'm going to mount it in the sunniest spot in my yard, where it will also get watered and generally live a good hard life. I think that directional top heavy sun and real life wet dry cycles for a season will help bring authenticity to its wood prior to preserving it.
When I go to preserve it, I’m going to be pretty aggressive with penetrating treatments that one could not usally do on wood still connected to a live vein, so the weathering for the most part needs to be done first.
 

HENDO

Shohin
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Here's a post I did for one of mine. I also went heavy on preserving, especially for the base of the deadwood. Even after a tonne of penetrating epoxy, the preserved upper sections where it was more weathered have already suffered from Houston humidity, but I'm sure much better than if they weren't properly preserved.

The trunks are already starting to fill the carved channels quite nicely.

Post in thread 'Tanuki ("tree-over-driftwood") bonsai...Q's on practical setting-up of such composures, as well as species & "type" Q's' https://www.bonsainut.com/threads/t...-as-well-as-species-type-qs.48524/post-835872
 

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