Pine id

Munch9

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I collected a little seedling on a trail I went this past sunday.
I believe its a scotchs pine but will be glad if someone can identify it for sure.
 

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Cruiser

Mame
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It can be difficult to Id seedlings. It’s much easier to identify the parent trees (assuming they’re around).
If you can, get closeup pictures of the bark, trunk, needles, buds, and cones of the mature pines around where you found it. Take a sample, if it’s not private property.

For what it’s worth, at a distance, those trees in your picture do not look like scots to me. The needles appear more densely spaced than what I’ve seen with for the species, especially at the branch tips.

I here that loblolly and slash pine are commercially planted in Brazil. Perhaps you have one of those.
 

Wires_Guy_wires

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Scots pines usually don't do well in warmer climates.
They have a typical transition in their bark: lower bark is dark and rugged barky, higher in the tree it's light brown or orange and super flakey.

I don't think it's a scots pine.
 

Arnold

Omono
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You need to take mature branches and cones, its important to know how many needles are in the bunch and how long they are
 

Munch9

Yamadori
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It can be difficult to Id seedlings. It’s much easier to identify the parent trees (assuming they’re around).
If you can, get closeup pictures of the bark, trunk, needles, buds, and cones of the mature pines around where you found it. Take a sample, if it’s not private property.

For what it’s worth, at a distance, those trees in your picture do not look like scots to me. The needles appear more densely spaced than what I’ve seen with for the species, especially at the branch tips.

I here that loblolly and slash pine are commercially planted in Brazil. Perhaps you have one of those.
Well, I live distantly from the place that I collected the seedling but I have a similar tree a couple of blocks down my house, I will go there someday and take some pictures.
Seeing what you said, I think its probably a loblolly.
 

Munch9

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I will take all of your considerations next time to better id. Thanks everyone!
 

Leo in N E Illinois

The Professor
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In Brazil, the pine types planted most often for pulp wood and timber are Pinus radiata or a hybrid pine with Pinus radiata in it's ancestry. The reason is that Pinus radiata does not need cold weather to set buds and growth for the next year and the lumber is good quality, for multiple uses.

Three or two needles in a bundle, as radiata pines come in both configurations.
 

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