pine wiring

robert gardner

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I have 6 ponderous pines that are 5 years old. They need to be wired now , my question is with the long needles can some of the needles be under the wire and if so what happens t them.
If anybody has any ideas please let me know.
 

Peter44

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You might want to drum up some pictures robert so the guys can swing in here and help you.
 

0soyoung

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I have 6 ponderous pines that are 5 years old. They need to be wired now , my question is with the long needles can some of the needles be under the wire and if so what happens t them.
If anybody has any ideas please let me know.
They can be under the wire - it looks horrible, but maybe you don't care. Those caught under the wire generally die quickly, so you start with needles looking like a bed-head or bad-hair-day that then winds up being highlighted as a line of brown needles spiraling around the branch.

So, it kinda boils down to being that you're going to loose those needles anyway (i.e., those that you cannot avoid wrapping the wire over), so just get rid of them before you wrap the wire on - the trees will look nicer. That is, after all, why you're wiring then, isn't it? But, if you don't care, it is only temporary and it is only your business.
 

Wires_Guy_wires

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When I wire over needles it does look bad, but they stay functional and alive for the entire year.
I keep them on, they don't cost a lot of energy and might just add a bit of extra resources.

They don't seem more or less susceptible to infections, so even though it's considered a bad practice, I wire over needles. Especially when it's young material.
 

Brian Van Fleet

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Remove old needles, don’t trap them under wires. Wiring is usually done in the fall or early spring. Light wiring on JBP can be done immediately following summer candle-cutting.
 

Adair M

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It’s possible to lay the wire between the needles so that they’re not trapped by the wire. Occasionally, you can pull a needle set that’s right in the way. It’s a pain to manipulate the branch and needles while you’re wiring to avoid trapping them, but it looks far better in the end.

Don’t do what 0soyoung advised.
 

sorce

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I can imagine a scenario where you have to both, wire a branch, and leave every needle there for it to live.

I'd argue one could use the long needles of a pP under the wire wrapped around with it as "raffia".

If you are wiring things merely out of the way, leave them. Why not?

I question how the needled part of a 5yo Pp even needs wire yet. It shouldn't.

Sorce
 

bwaynef

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If you're going to bother wiring it, take the time to move the needles out of the way or pluck them if you can't get them out of the way. If that's too cumbersome, you may need to slow down.
 

Paradox

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Wait until fall to wire.

Dont put needles under wire. Take the time to do it right and wire in between the needles.
Takes longer, requires patience and is pain staking but its better for the tree.
 

Paradox

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I was thinking about just defoliating the pine before wiring. I wonder why nobody suggested that..

I wire in the fall when you generally thin needles and remove older needles anyway. However you will need to wire in places where you want needles so defoliating may not be an option.
 

Adair M

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By the way, don’t attempt to pull Pondy needles. If you do, you’re likely to tear tissue on the stem, which leaves it open for disease. Rather, cut the needles to only about 1/8 inch long.
 
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