Pinus radiata (Monterey Pine)?

Jow

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Pinus radiata or Monterey Pine is quite a popular species in Australia by means of availability. It has been planted extensively as a timber crop since the 1960's and as a result there are many escapees that find their way into bonsai backyards.

I am making this post to see if anyone on the other side of the pond grow them. I have been growing them for a number of years (see one such tree here) and have a couple of issues with them:

1. Needle length / need reduction techniques (long and twisted needles.)


2. Back budding. (none on older wood)

I tend to think that there must be techniques to achieve the above two points. I have noticed some years on some trees i get short neat needles (particularly on old trees that need a repot) and when used as xmas trees they will bud from stumps when the top of the tree is cut off at harvesting time.

Surely these behaviours can be forced to happen via some type of technique or using the right seasonal timing.

So if anyone out there grows them i would love to hear from you and about any techniques and or seasonal tasks you might do to grow this species in bonsai culture.

Thanks,

Joe.
 

grog

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Love your blog but have nothing significant to offer. It is interesting that both of the problems you mention are frequently associated with ponderosa pine, it would be worthwhile to see if the techniques used with ponderosa to assist with needle length and backbudding would be useful for your radiata also.
 

Jow

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Love your blog but have nothing significant to offer. It is interesting that both of the problems you mention are frequently associated with ponderosa pine, it would be worthwhile to see if the techniques used with ponderosa to assist with needle length and backbudding would be useful for your radiata also.

Thanks for the reply Grog. We dont have many ponderosa (if any) bonsai in Australia so i have never looked into the techniques related to growing them. I will have to do a bit of reading and reaserch and then see how well it may cross over to radiatas.

Thanks.
 

riprap

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One biological fact that may be a consideration is that P. radiata is a relatively short-lived tree. An age of 125 years has been considered the probable upper limit (McClintock, E., 2001, The Trees of Golden Gate Park).
 

Jow

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One biological fact that may be a consideration is that P. radiata is a relatively short-lived tree. An age of 125 years has been considered the probable upper limit (McClintock, E., 2001, The Trees of Golden Gate Park).

Thanks Riprap. I dont think that will be a mojor problem as even if i am growning an original 1960's tree that should give me until 2085 to get a decient tree out of it.

Some even argue that trees in Bonsai cultivation can live indefinately but i cant really comment on that as i have no real knowledge on that topic.

Thanks for the input.

Joe.
 

Jow

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I have hit a bit of a brick wall in regards to finding Ponderosa techniques.

Would anyone be kind enough to share a years worth of seasonal tasks that they use to get smaller needles and back budding on on of these pines?
 

grog

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I don't have a link handy but Walter Pall offered some of his care with Ponderosa over on bonsai study group, just don't remember which thread it was in.
 

Jow

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Thanks, I will have a look over there...
 

Jow

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Thanks for the links.

I will have a look.
 

tanlu

Shohin
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Jow,

I grow Japanese Black and White pines, which are very different from pinus ridiata, but your progression series on your tree has been very helpful!

Looking forward to seeing more.

T
 

Wall

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I wish Monterey pines did as well in Monterey as they do down under :D
 

Jow

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I have heard you get problems over there.... perhaps you need to import seed from us now... hahaha.
 
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One biological fact that may be a consideration is that P. radiata is a relatively short-lived tree. An age of 125 years has been considered the probable upper limit (McClintock, E., 2001, The Trees of Golden Gate Park).

Hi all,

There are Radiata pine growing in dry conditions over the mountains in Australia that were planted around the gold rush times which were from 1850 onwards.

Many of these trees are still alive but multi trunked, flat topped and slowly breaking down.

I wood guess in our conditons a natural lifespan may be around 200 years; but as bonsai who knows,

Hrant
 

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