Pinus Sylvestris in rock

Kadebe

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I acquired this pinus two weeks ago. The owner could not say exactly what species it was. On another forum, some say that this was a mugo, but most were of the opinion that this is a sylvestris.


IMG_0310.jpeg

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The slate is 80 cm long. The large dome has a width of 50 cm. The height measures 54 cm.

The soil consists of ordinary soil, mixed with grit. It is, in my opinion, a rather thin layer (about 3 cm). The last repotting was 5 years ago. The soil does not smell fresh, rather moldy. The drainage is not really optimal. As far as I have been able to look at the bottom of the slate, there are no drainage holes. Also... I have already removed a lot of woodlous... and found this morning that there is still a large family residing there o_O

My plan:
In my opinion, it is now too late for repotting? Also...given the current weather and the forecast for the next few weeks, I don't think these will go into summer dormancy.
My plan is, at the end of next winter, to place them in a wooden box so that the root system can recover properly.

In this I am thinking of removing the outer 5 cm of soil and replacing it with bonsai substrate. Then placing these on top of a layer of 2-3 cm of bonsai substrate.
Then after a two years...back on the stone, but this time with drainage holes, and and again removing e bit of old soil and replacing it with bonsai substrate.

As a beginner, I'm not at home with this stuff... so it's a pretty steep learning curve :p... and love it

Stil have e few questions though....
  1. Is this a Pinus Sylvestris?
  2. What is the best method for transition from this soil to bonsai substrate?
  3. How much of the old soil can I remove in one time?
  4. Do I need to remove some foliage when repotting?
  5. If the tree responds well, is putting it back on the slate after two years too soon?
 

Wires_Guy_wires

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Judging from the smooth bark, I think it's a mugo.
Sylvestris has flaking bark from a 1cm thickness and up, in general. Mugo doesn't always do that.

2. Whatever works, but best to do it when it's meant to be repotted.
3. Half of it at most is safe to aim for, a half bare root.
4. Nope, unless you go heavy on the roots, which isn't necessary if you pick the right container. The less you remove, the easier it'll bounce back.
5. Lets think about that when it's time.
 

Kadebe

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Judging from the smooth bark, I think it's a mugo.
Sylvestris has flaking bark from a 1cm thickness and up, in general. Mugo doesn't always do that.

2. Whatever works, but best to do it when it's meant to be repotted.
3. Half of it at most is safe to aim for, a half bare root.
4. Nope, unless you go heavy on the roots, which isn't necessary if you pick the right container. The less you remove, the easier it'll bounce back.
5. Lets think about that when it's time.
So... a mugo. Another picture of the branches

IMG_0317.jpeg
 

Wires_Guy_wires

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I see smoothish bark, a ringed structure and the way these branches grow make me think of specifically the Mugo Pumillo cultivar.
 

Wires_Guy_wires

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I have a bunch of scots pines 2 years from seed and four cultivars age 3 and up, all of them have crests in their bark. The mugos I've owned for four years are still smooth and keep the fascicle scars/bumps for a long time.
The forking on the branches I see is rather typical for mugo, sylvestris can do this too, but it's a bit rare.
When mugo are properly fed, their needles can become as long as scots pines.
Mugo can be a light lime green like scots pine, but only scots pines go glaucous.
 

Paradox

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I am leaning toward mugo as well.
Might be the light but the color looks off to me.
I'd make sure its getting enough water
 

Kadebe

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I am leaning toward mugo as well.
Might be the light but the color looks off to me.
I'd make sure its getting enough water
Thanks all

It's getting enough water... My feeling is that the soil stays too wet. That's why I'll repot it before next spring.
Is there any distinctive difference between scots pine and mugo?
 

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