Pittosporum Flowers

Ross

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Hi guys. My little Pittosporum flowered for the first time so I thought I'd share the pictures.
 

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Sweet little flowers.... :)

What's the common name? I feel like I should know what this is... but it's escaping me. They look like they must smell sweet.

Kindest regards,

Victrinia
 

M.B.

Mame
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They're called Mock orange and yes they smell very much like orange blossoms.
Mary B.
 

Ross

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They're called Mock orange and yes they smell very much like orange blossoms.
Mary B.

No that's not it, but the flowers look similar. Wikipedia says it is also known as 'cheesewood' but I have never heard it called that.
 

Bill S

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If the Mock orange you speak of is the same as mine it wouldn't make good bonsai from what Iv'e seen of them. Not sure about this one though.

But run thru google I got that it is just that - Another common name for this plant is Japanese mockorange because the scent put forth by its blossoms is similar to that of the sweet orange (Citrus sinensis). The small flowers are about 0.5 in (1.3 cm) in diameter and are held in clusters at the branch tips. They are pure white when they emerge from the bud and slowly age to a mellow creamy yellow. They appear in late spring and last for several weeks. Flowers are more noticeable and attractive on the nonvariegated plants thanks to the handsome background of dark green foliage.

Here is the link I checked with - http://www.bing.com/search?q=Pittosporum&FORM=MYMSNA&web=
 
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Ross

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If the Mock orange you speak of is the same as mine it wouldn't make good bonsai from what Iv'e seen of them. Not sure about this one though.

But run thru google I got that it is just that - Another common name for this plant is Japanese mockorange because the scent put forth by its blossoms is similar to that of the sweet orange (Citrus sinensis). The small flowers are about 0.5 in (1.3 cm) in diameter and are held in clusters at the branch tips. They are pure white when they emerge from the bud and slowly age to a mellow creamy yellow. They appear in late spring and last for several weeks. Flowers are more noticeable and attractive on the nonvariegated plants thanks to the handsome background of dark green foliage.

Here is the link I checked with - http://www.bing.com/search?q=Pittosporum&FORM=MYMSNA&web=

Well that link looks right, but when you search for Mock Orange in Wikipedia (maybe that's my problem) it doesn't look like what I've got. I'm gonna stick with calling it Pittosporum. :)
 

M.B.

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Maybe I should clarify. Around here some varieties of Pittosporum are called "mock orange". There are 9 different common types listed in the Sunset Western Garden book. There are actually several different plants called mock orange due to thier flowers and smell. Choisya ternata (Mexican or mock orange), several types of Philadelphus, and Pittosporum "Wheelers Dwarf" which is often labeled mock orange by local nurserys. Just depends where you live.
Mary B.
 

Ross

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...and Pittosporum "Wheelers Dwarf" which is often labeled mock orange by local nurserys.

That's it Mary. I vaguely remember that from the tag, and the google images are spot on.
 

garywood

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Hey Ross, nice find and good little tree. At Telperion Farm we started growing these a few years ago as a substitute for Crepe Myrtle in the northwest.
Wood
 

Ross

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Hey Ross, nice find and good little tree. At Telperion Farm we started growing these a few years ago as a substitute for Crepe Myrtle in the northwest.
Wood

Thanks Gary. It seems pretty cold-tolerant so good luck with yours.
 

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