Planning ahead for the future....2

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Since the last thread was disrupted with unprovoked attempts to incite yet another flame war by some of the very people who cry for bonsai related content, I am reposting the thread so that those who were discussing it can do so without having to wade through pages of meaningless garbage that accomplishes nothing.

I know I am not alone in planning ahead for the future, not only for myself, but for my daughters as well.

Of course, I am talking about stock. ;)

Most people who know me know that I have hundreds of pines growing in a field up north at my cabin, none are anything special yet, but in another few years I might pull some decent Shohin stock out of it and when my daughters reach my age, they will have some great material, hopefully.

Vance Wood introduced me to the wonderful world of vending at shows a few years back. Since that time we have bought hundreds of young Black Pines and Scots Pines for resale. These are younger trees, never having been worked on. many of these sell right away, those that do not sell the first year are given a preliminary styling and sold the next year at a slightly higher price, as so on.....

However, I always keep a percentage of the trees, hack some down, wire others, put others into the ground, or a combination of these things. These are for the future.

This size is the perfect size for bending future literati, cascade, and informal upright styles. Many will go back in the ground for growth, some, such as some literati will stay in pots. None are, of course, anything to brag about, just base shapes with a future in mind, maybe 10 years or more out. It's like playing chess, know your next moves in advance and follow them.

In another thread I promised to show some of this base styling on some of these young trees. Later tonight I will post some here. All critiques can wait a decade. ;)



Will
 
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So, base styling on raw, young trees. The key is making a decision, good or bad, the first decision must always be made.

First set a pile of trees down in front of you.

Tip, only set a few down at a time, bringing them all over can overwhelm you. ;)

Excuse the obvious backyard chaos, the pool is in, but the concrete has yet to be poured for ther patios.
 

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A quick sorting will reveal what can be wired now and what should be chopped. Great lower budding can call for a chop, as can whorls that swelled too much.
 

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When in doubt, chop. ;)
 

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The chops go in the ground.


Then, keeping in mind resale, you let your mind run free.
 

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Do what feels right, do it once, this is just the first base styling to add movement, to define the future shape. Adjustments can be made on future stylings.
 

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TheSteve

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Will just a thought here. Don't you find it more effective to make cascades from a bottom branch or at least use a bottom branch for a new leader/apex? This helps avoid the bent fishing rod look. (to me anyway)
 
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Some go in the ground, some go to the shows, some stay in pots.....you're the one who decides.


A few years later and you'll have something to begin work on. Meanwhile you can aquire some, lift some out of the ground, and grow out some slightly older stock as well.
 

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Will just a thought here. Don't you find it more effective to make cascades from a bottom branch or at least use a bottom branch for a new leader/apex? This helps avoid the bent fishing rod look. (to me anyway)

From older stock, yes. From this young stuff, there are so many buds and branches on them that the main idea is to get it down, add movement, and later decide if you want a apex or not. By the time the sacrifice branches grow out and thicken the trunk, while the other branches distort it, the "bow" will be gone. The advantage of young stock is it is pliable and forgiving.

Remember these are for the future, at least 10 years down the line, the bends will be worked a few more times, and, depending on the growth obtained, these cascades could well have the planting angle changed five years down the line into slants, informals, whatever. They will also be chopped a few times during that period, the key here is to add movement and begin trunk thickening.


Good question,


Will
 

RyanFrye

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Who says you don't have any trees!?;)

I think you're off to great start with those pines.
 

ovation22

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Will,

I have 2 questions.

In the second photo (chop_001_before_500.jpg) what is the material that resembles netting around the base of the tree?

Two, in this photo (cascade_stock_after_500.jpg) the shape appears to be quite unnatural. Cascades (in my experience) don't typically start in one direction and then bend back over like this. Can you share your thoughts on this? Will this be corrected in a future potting, or do you have other plans for this particular tree?
 

ovation22

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Please disregard question 2, it seems TheSteve and I were eyeing the same tree, and you've already replied to him.
 
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In the second photo (chop_001_before_500.jpg) what is the material that resembles netting around the base of the tree?

This batch of trees were purchased as "plugs" meaning they came basically bare-rooted, with roots sticking out of the cheesecloth covered plugs. Of course, they needed to be potted right away, this was accomplished by giving the longer roots a brief trimming and potting in plastic pots. After a year or two of free growth, they were ready for some basic first styling work, mainly just introducing movement or chopping.

Those that were put into the ground had the, now well rotted, cheesecloth removed, the tap roots cut, and the rots spread out. Those that remained in pots will undergo this treatment when they are eventually re-potted.



Will
 

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