Please advise on my hinoki

stromy

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I've got this hinoki earlier this year. It's been doing well, grew up about an inch, but now it has some yellow leaves. All of those leaves seem to be on downfacing parts of branches or near the starting points of branches. Is it a normal thing at the end of season or should I worry/do something? Some advices would be greatly appreciated. Thank you all in advance.
 

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Shibui

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All leaves have a finite life. We know that deciduous leaves only last 1 summer but even evergreen tree leaves (needles) only last a few years then die. Meanwhile new needles have grown near the tips of the branches.
The other factor you have picked up is that needles that do not see much sun are not making food for the tree so from the tree's point of view are a waste of resources. Trees will shed leaves that are not producing food - usually shaded ones.
As long as the yellow needles are either older ones or shaded ones that will be perfectly normal.

There are probably lots of Hinoki cultivars but yours is not one I have seen before. Can we see the branches a bit closer please. The bits I can see do not actually look right for hinoki.
 
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This looks like Sekka or Chirimen hinoki and I have a few of those as well.
The last few weeks there was some yellowing on mine as well, mostly older and inner growth.
I don't worry about it because it is more or less the same with the chamaecyparis obtusa nana gracilis I also have.
 

stromy

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Can we see the branches a bit closer please. The bits I can see do not actually look right for hinoki.

I bought it tagged as Chamaecyparis obtusa 'Chirimen' - as ShimpakuBonsai has identified. Adding a couple of closer pics.
Thank you both for your inputs.
 

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Kanorin

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It's normal for hinoki to do this to shaded out or interior foliage. I've seen it happen mostly in the fall-winter.
At this point I don't think there is anything you can do about the foliage that has already yellowed.

But let's suppose next year you identify a small branch that's in a perfect spot for the final design of the tree. Make sure that foliage gets good sunlight next year! Maybe that means facing it toward the sun or clipping an overhanging branch. A good time to do that pruning work to set your branching up is in May.
 

stromy

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Thank you, Kanorin. I appreciate your advice.
 
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In your other post about Chirimen / Sekka Hinoki I mentioned a Youtube channel (click).

A new video was posted today about removing the "red leaves" of Sekka Hinoki.

 

stromy

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In your other post about Chirimen / Sekka Hinoki I mentioned a Youtube channel (click).

A new video was posted today about removing the "red leaves" of Sekka Hinoki.

Yes, this is another source saying the same as you all have. Thanks much, ShimpakuBonsai. It's a nice hinoki-focused channel.
 

a1dusty

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It's normal for hinoki to do this to shaded out or interior foliage. I've seen it happen mostly in the fall-winter.
At this point I don't think there is anything you can do about the foliage that has already yellowed.

But let's suppose next year you identify a small branch that's in a perfect spot for the final design of the tree. Make sure that foliage gets good sunlight next year! Maybe that means facing it toward the sun or clipping an overhanging branch. A good time to do that pruning work to set your branching up is in May.
All my trees are turned weekly , would that not help 🤔
 
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