Please post some of your trees... :)

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#81
Here are a couple of black pines I've been working on - a nishiki and a yatsubusa. The yatsubusa had a grafted branch with regular sized needles, so I've been replacing the foliage on that branch with dwarf shoots pruned from elsewhere on the tree.

View attachment 34798 View attachment 34799

Scott
Wow,
Great trunks. Great trees.
Tona
 

Poink88

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#84
Here are a couple of black pines I've been working on - a nishiki and a yatsubusa. The yatsubusa had a grafted branch with regular sized needles, so I've been replacing the foliage on that branch with dwarf shoots pruned from elsewhere on the tree.

View attachment 34798 View attachment 34799

Scott
I agree with Scott, these deserve their own threads :) Very nice trees.

What happened to the original graft...was it intentional to get a faster branch development or just an accident?
 

Poink88

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#85
This is a new Emperor 1 Maple I just got. What do you think of the nebari? Potential?
View attachment 34806
Based on the pic, it may need some work. Above it could be a graft that has a bulge (reverse taper) now...I personally am inclined on layering it just below the bulge and use that as the new base. If you do, keep that sucker growing there to help it thicken faster.

Your son need a better tool. ;) That is cute that he does bonsai already, I hope he keeps at it.
 

markyscott

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#86
I agree with Scott, these deserve their own threads :) Very nice trees.

What happened to the original graft...was it intentional to get a faster branch development or just an accident?
Thanks Poink88 - I'll post them at some point. The tree is an import, so I can only speculate. But it appears that all of the branches were grafted. I'm guessing that its a mikawa trunk onto which the grower wished to graft dwarf foliage. It appears that one of the branches that was used was not the same variety as the others. It may be corrected, but it will take a few years to grow the new branch out. Hopefully the grafts will take. Still green after almost 3 months - a good sign, but the candles have not started to extend yet.

Scott
 
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#87
Based on the pic, it may need some work. Above it could be a graft that has a bulge (reverse taper) now...I personally am inclined on layering it just below the bulge and use that as the new base. If you do, keep that sucker growing there to help it thicken faster.

Your son need a better tool. ;) That is cute that he does bonsai already, I hope he keeps at it.
Thanks for the tip. I am thinking of making my first airlayering attempt with the long branch that comes off to the side. This probably needs to be cut off any way but will give me some practice.
 

Anthony

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#88
Here is a 32 or 33 year old Celtis from Lafayette, Louisiana, came out the fridge on April 1st.
I will send a second image of the growth allowed for the spring burst before any pruning will be done for the year.

The cut roots are an attempt to get new plants.
Good Day.
Anthony
 

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Poink88

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#90
Here is a 32 or 33 year old Celtis from Lafayette, Louisiana, came out the fridge on April 1st.
Anthony, I salute your dedication and lengths you go through to grow this. :cool:

Yesterday, I was just discussing with my wife that we have about 20 tropicals in our dining room right now but if we ever get hit with really deep freeze...I might have to bring in 5 times that. The car will be ejected from the garage for sure but some will probably have to occupy the dining and kitchen area as well. As much as I love them, I think it is time to re-think things and thin down the cold temperature sensitive (tropical) trees the next few months. :(
 

Anthony

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#91
Dario,

are they true tropicals or sub-tropicals ?

Ficus from China, is a sub-tropical, as is Fukien tea, Serissa, Chinese elm, Murraya, Sageretia,and so on. What happens is most folk baby Sub-Tropicals [ Bougainvillea ] and they lose the ability to handle sub-tropical temperatures.

Often you can start them back over at spring time and re-acclimate them to their birth temperatures.

Additionally see what the Chinese do for wintering.
I doubt they are running back and forth with trees for months leading to late spring, same for the Japanese in zone 7 or colder.
Whatever you do, best to you.
Good Morning.
Anthony

* Oh I forgot to say this [ same tree is bening shown on IBC ] this tree has no real shape, it is a victim for experimenting.
 

Poink88

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#92
The 20 are all tropicals (buttonwood, neea, campeche/logwood, tintillo, BRT, etc.) but I have lots of sub-tropicals also outside; Fukien Tea, ficus, Barbados Cherry, Coma, etc. I heard that yaupon holly cannot handle deep freeze and we can have one every few years. A good friend told me he lost lots of yaupon when we got hit with 17*F a few years back. I am not sure how low cedar elm can handle but I have lots of those too.
 
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markyscott

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#93
Dario,

are they true tropicals or sub-tropicals ?

Ficus from China, is a sub-tropical, as is Fukien tea, Serissa, Chinese elm, Murraya, Sageretia,and so on. What happens is most folk baby Sub-Tropicals [ Bougainvillea ] and they lose the ability to handle sub-tropical temperatures.

Often you can start them back over at spring time and re-acclimate them to their birth temperatures.

Additionally see what the Chinese do for wintering.
I doubt they are running back and forth with trees for months leading to late spring, same for the Japanese in zone 7 or colder.
Whatever you do, best to you.
Good Morning.
Anthony

* Oh I forgot to say this [ same tree is bening shown on IBC ] this tree has no real shape, it is a victim for experimenting.
I concur. Temperatures into the low 40s are not a problem for the trees Anthony mentioned and Austin likely won't see anything that low until next December. Ficus trees are planted as street trees in San Fransisco! That city definitely doesn't have a tropical climate - I recall the kind of temperatures you experiencing now (highs in the 60s, lows in the 50s) in mid-summer. As I recall, 24th St. in the Mission District is lined with them - some over 100 years old. I think a bunch of them died in a freak cold snap in the early 90s when temps dropped into the low 20s, but other than hard freezes like that they can handle our weather here in Texas.

This was a pretty mild winter here in Texas, Dario. In Houston we had a couple of freeze warnings, and I recall some temperature dips down into the mid-30s. But with the exception of a couple of weeks, my "tropicals" (Black Olive, willow leaf ficus, macrocarpa, Fukien tea, texas ebony, etc) have been out of the greenhouse all winter. If you take your trees out now, the tree will be happy, as will your wife. Heck, she'll probably even let you buy some more!


Scott
 

Poink88

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#94
I concur. Temperatures into the low 40s are not a problem for the trees Anthony mentioned and Austin likely won't see anything that low until next December. Ficus trees are planted as street trees in San Fransisco! That city definitely doesn't have a tropical climate - I recall the kind of temperatures you experiencing now (highs in the 60s, lows in the 50s) in mid-summer. As I recall, 24th St. in the Mission District is lined with them - some over 100 years old. I think a bunch of them died in a freak cold snap in the early 90s when temps dropped into the low 20s, but other than hard freezes like that they can handle our weather here in Texas.

This was a pretty mild winter here in Texas, Dario. In Houston we had a couple of freeze warnings, and I recall some temperature dips down into the mid-30s. But with the exception of a couple of weeks, my "tropicals" (Black Olive, willow leaf ficus, macrocarpa, Fukien tea, texas ebony, etc) have been out of the greenhouse all winter. If you take your trees out now, the tree will be happy, as will your wife. Heck, she'll probably even let you buy some more!


Scott
Scott, Did you read my response to Anthony? The trees you listed (I have all of them) are outside. You do not have "real" tropicals that I have so I do not know if you can truly relate.

Thanks for the input though. :)
 

markyscott

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#95
Scott, Did you read my response to Anthony? The trees you listed (I have all of them) are outside. You do not have "real" tropicals that I have so I do not know if you can truly relate.

Thanks for the input though. :)
Sorry, didn't read it until after I posted, but neither did I share a complete inventory of all of my trees.

Scott
 

Poink88

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#96
...but neither did I share a complete inventory of all of my trees.
Scott,

Could be but I assume you posted the most "tropical" you have given the subject we are discussing. ;) (did I assume wrong?)

It also appear that your winter is milder than ours...maybe because of your proximity to the gulf? If you read what started this is my fear of the worst case scenario where we can have 17*F (I believe we even had 14*F) and how I would make it easier (for me) when it comes (definitely not the next few months but for years ahead). :)
 

october

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#97
What a tree can take and what is should be subjected to are 2 different things. If you have doubts about leaving them out when it gets cold, you lose nothing by being cautious. However, you may lose by not being cautious.

For me, wind is a problem. It tends to be windy and cold at my house well into May. In fact, it is usually windy at my house much of the time. My trees are not very large, so there is a chance that they can blow right off the ledge. Anyway, taking them down and depriving them of a few hours of sun for an occasional afternnon is much better than leaving them up and having them blow off the ledge. Coming home at the end of the day and seeing a tree you worked on for 8 plus years on the cement with the shattered pot on the side of it is not something I am willing to tolerate again.;)

Rob
 
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#99
Here is a 32 or 33 year old Celtis from Lafayette, Louisiana, came out the fridge on April 1st.
I will send a second image of the growth allowed for the spring burst before any pruning will be done for the year.

The cut roots are an attempt to get new plants.
Good Day.
Anthony
Anthony,
why do you keep the celtis in the fridge? I have both C africana and sinensis, but so far kept them just outside in full sun, without any cold treatment. C Africana is almost exactly the same as sinensis in appearance, but I think both can survive without winter. They are sold in SA as bonsai both and many places there have no winter.
I want to see your fridge, and how long and how you put your trees inside.
 

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