Polyphosphate water filter for water with high Calcium, Hardness and Alakinity

Bonsai Nut

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Our water here is so hard I'd be concerned that you'd load up that filter very quickly, and then unless you were testing your water on a regular basis you'd never know when the filter capacity was used up.
 

yenling83

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Unfortunately, I just don't think that would do enough or last long enough. In So Cal I think the two best options are either a Reverse Osmosis system followed by collecting rain water. You could also do both. I've been really happy with my Stealth 200. It's more pricey, but drops my water PPM from about 300-400 to 15-10. I hook mine up to a float pump and fill a large brute trash can.

http://www.amazon.com/Hydro-Logic-3...36664&sr=8-2&keywords=stealth+reverse+osmosis
 

Bonsai Nut

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Has anybody tried this polyphophosate filter before?

By the way I checked it out - the filter material is polyphosphate so it would only impact calcium and magnesium in the water. Trust me, water in Southern California has a lot more nasty stuff in it than that - not the least of which are chloramines (chlorine bound with ammonia). Chloramines are so bad that if I fill 6" of water in my 5' deep koi pond with treating it, I will see dead fish.

I use RO/DI water for drinking water, ice cubes, and reef aquariums. If you went this route you would need a rain barrel or similar container to store it in as it slowly refills water that is used.

I have used these guys in the past and they supply my filters. I highly recommend them if you go this route.
 

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