pomegranate.. could this one work for Bonsai?

alonsou

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Hello guys,

My folks have decide to get rid of a pomegranate that has been outside in the front yard of their place for several years (7+)

I asked them and they agreed to have me dig it out and do my little bonsai thing to it.

This is the tree in question:







Its about 5 feet tall, with a trunk about 3.5 inches. You can tell that there's not much activity on the first 12 inches of the trunk so if I graft a few seddlings to the empty area wait for the to take, and then chop and take one of those graft as the new leader would it work? My question is, how would you approach it? When will be the best time to dig it out? Anything I need to do to prepare it for the dig? Any thoughts

Thanks.
 

PaulH

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No need to graft. Pomegranates will bud back like crazy after you chop it. I'd dig it next spring and chop it back to a basic tapered trunkline and watch it grow new branches.
 

Mike423

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I agree that collecting in the spring would be best. If it doesn't have to be removed right away though you might want to consider air layering one or two of the larger branches first if they have decent branching and your up to waiting an extra year.

Other than that I would say chop it a little higher than you wish the new leader to be, and then once the new growth sprouts and you get a better idea of what you want to go with it, after a year (and the sprouts are a little thicker) then you could chop to where you desire the new leader to be. I just would recommend this since you dont know where the new growth will sprout and doing the final reduction chop the following year would be better since the branches will be more developed and less likely to die (since that would ruin the shape if done right after new growth pushes).
 

Colorado Slim

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I agree that collecting in the spring would be best. If it doesn't have to be removed right away though you might want to consider air layering one or two of the larger branches first if they have decent branching and your up to waiting an extra year.

You will always appreciate waiting that extra year. You could end up with two or three nice trees out of this one, instead of just the one.
 

alonsou

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Which of the 2 will be more effective? air layer or the tourniquet method ? so far I had only done 2 air layers with a 50% success ratio.
 

Mike423

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You might be confused but the tourniquet method is just another form of layering (like the ring cut). The tourniquet method is generally only used when a in ground layering is being done. I would recommend the method of cutting a ring around the trunk removing the bark and the green (Cambrian) layer until you actually get the the wood underneath.

As far as your air layering success ratio, it is probably due to your layering 'soil' media being used and care afterward. How have you done your layering before and how many have you attempted. That way we can see what you are doing wrong and right.
 

alonsou

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You might be confused but the tourniquet method is just another form of layering (like the ring cut). The tourniquet method is generally only used when a in ground layering is being done. I would recommend the method of cutting a ring around the trunk removing the bark and the green (Cambrian) layer until you actually get the the wood underneath.

As far as your air layering success ratio, it is probably due to your layering 'soil' media being used and care afterward. How have you done your layering before and how many have you attempted. That way we can see what you are doing wrong and right.

Thanks Mike.. yes I do understand the difference of both layering techniques.. I was just triying to find out which one was better.

As far as the prior experiences.. I have done only two air layers.. using spagnum moss on both with rooting hormones applied to the wound. One took on a trident maple and the one that failed was on some kind of frutting tree.. I can't remember the name right now.
 
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Mike423

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I've heard of some people using actual Bonsai soil on their layering but I have always use sphagnum moss. Its really all about making sure you dont over keep it too moist but even more important to not allow it to dry out. I always make sure the top of the layering cut is made very smooth and not damaged. After I cut the ring and remove the bark I take a razor blade or grafting knife to go over the top part where the roots will emerge again. Also try to make sure the air layering bag isn't exposed to too much light so as not to cook the new developing roots. There are various ways to prevent this from happening.
 

alonsou

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I've heard of some people using actual Bonsai soil on their layering but I have always use sphagnum moss. Its really all about making sure you dont over keep it too moist but even more important to not allow it to dry out. I always make sure the top of the layering cut is made very smooth and not damaged. After I cut the ring and remove the bark I take a razor blade or grafting knife to go over the top part where the roots will emerge again. Also try to make sure the air layering bag isn't exposed to too much light so as not to cook the new developing roots. There are various ways to prevent this from happening.

When you clean the edge from where the roots will emerge, do you make some kind of taper edge or just a straight cut?, perhaps the reason the second layering failed was due to keeping it too wet, now that I remember...:eek:
 

Mike423

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A strait cut. I just do this to make sure none of the Cambrian layer tissue in the exposed cut area is not bruised or damaged. The prolonged exposure to moisture probably did it then. Just another watering expertise that needs to be perfected over time:D
 

alonsou

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Here's how the tree looks now, yesterday I removed some branches to make it easier to see the inner branch structure, definitely, I can come up with a few air layers.



 

rock

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plant all the scraps , they start from cuttings like crazy

any size is worth trying

right now perfect time
 

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