Pomegranate trunk turning black. A fungus among us?

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#1
I got this pomegranate in an auction last fall. I was curious about why the base of the trunk was so dark, but figured I'd watch and see.

Now that it is waking up some, it seems like the black is creeping upwards. I'd suspect it was a result of overwatering but letting it dry pretty much all the way out hasn't helped.

The tree was repotted last spring, so I wasn't planning on doing it this year. But now I'm worried about root rot. But on the other hand, maybe this is normal, since I do see this kind of darkness at the nebari of "good" trees every now and then.

IMG_20180307_205306.jpg

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0soyoung

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#2
I don't think it is anything to worry about, but

2 tablespoons (3% hydrogen peroxide from your grocery/pharmacy) in a quart of water
  • Apply as a root drench to arrest root rot
  • Spray above ground - broad spectrum fungicide/bacteriacide.

I suggest applying root drench in lieu of watering the next time watering is needed.
Spray every few days above ground

Peroxide is just water with an extra, loosely bound oxygen atom. The reactive oxygen 'burns up' (no flame) the bad guys leaving just water behind - very eco-friendly. It is an effective broad-spectrum fungicide/bacteriacide with no latency, meaning it only attacks what is present at the time of application.
 

just.wing.it

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#3
I don't think it is anything to worry about, but

2 tablespoons (3% hydrogen peroxide from your grocery/pharmacy) in a quart of water
  • Apply as a root drench to arrest root rot
  • Spray above ground - broad spectrum fungicide/bacteriacide.

I suggest applying root drench in lieu of watering the next time watering is needed.
Spray every few days above ground

Peroxide is just water with an extra, loosely bound oxygen atom. The reactive oxygen 'burns up' (no flame) the bad guys leaving just water behind - very eco-friendly. It is an effective broad-spectrum fungicide/bacteriacide with no latency, meaning it only attacks what is present at the time of application.
Déjà vu Oso???
 

GrimLore

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#7
Daconil spray on the trunk bi-weekly for two months, easy... With good air circulation, moderate sun, and just watering the substrate you will never have the problem again.

Grimmy
 

Shima

Chumono
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Hawaii, 4,000 ft, rainforest
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#8
With good air circulation, moderate sun, and just watering the substrate you will never have the problem again.
None of that here for months at a time plus high humudity 75% at times. I put up with this for 2 years on this and others and just burned it. Have a lot of black corpses lying around. Enough! P1020813.jpeg P1020814.jpeg P1020815.jpeg P1020816.jpeg P1020817.jpeg P1020818.jpeg P1020819.jpeg
 
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Location
Minnesota
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#9
Thanks all!

I know I've seen your H2O2 advice on here somewhere already, @0soyoung, I just couldn't tell whether this was a problem of the type that I should expect H2O2 to fix.
 

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