Poor shimp

Mojosan

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Here's a shimpaku I just picked up. It has some wiring scars (steel wire ! ) and came out of some pretty nasty gray clay. This plastic pot was all I had readily available, but it's good enough for now.
There is some bud-back on the upper trunk, and overall doesn't appear in too bad of shape considering it has obviously been unattended for some time. There were actually pieces of wire on it so rusty that they had rusted through.

So, what advice doest thou have?
 

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garywood

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Hi Mo?, when giving advise, what you give is an accumulation of one's experience and exposure. Now, the problem arises when the ask-er and the giver have differing life experiences. One sees "A" and the other interpret it as "B". Nothing "wrong" with that, it's just the way it is. A better approach would be; I see this tree as being "X" and how do you think I should get there. Or, Do you think this tree has the right right proportion for "Y". My whole point is; when approaching a tree, have a vision of what you think (your vision) might be possible. There is always a great number of people that express their view or vision and then you can assimilate these differing visions or opinions and come to a conclusion that's YOURS. Growing in bonsai or any of the arts is about accumulating knowledge and experience and molding these to fit your vision. Rambled toooo much.
Wood
 
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Mojosan

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Thanks for your input. I think.....
I was asking the question - "What would you do with this? " I already have ideas for what I think I would like to do - I am just looking for those "b" opinions you mention. If that is ok ....
 
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garywood

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Hi Jo? I guess there was one too many vino in my response and was waxing a little philosophical :) Got to get out more :) A more standard answer; it needs pruning and thinning and wiring. Since you know where you want to go the next step would be to remove branche(s) that serve no purpose in the design. for instance, there are stacked branches (one directly over another) one of them needs to go. The first or third image makes a good front so name your poison and pick the best branch to keep. A good wiring and thinning will make a nice tree
Wood
 

Vance Wood

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You should remove the wire if you have not done that already. Did I understand you to say the tree was planted in a grey clay? If that is so you should repot as soon as possible. Shimps can grow in almost anything but that does not mean they should. I would remove at least 50% of the old soil, most easily removed by hosing it off with a high pressure. I would not be so concerned about a bonsai pot for it at present, the important thing is to get it healthy. Shimpakus are a bit of an enigma: They can stand brutal treatment in wiring, pruning, and repotting all at the same time but they take at least two growing seasons to regain strength and should be left alone. In other words they are slow to re-develop a root system.
 

Bonsai Nut

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I have certainly seen shimpakus in worse shape. First step, get it healthy, which includes repotting if required. Don't go overboard with the root trimming, especially at this time of year.

The biggest issue you will have with this tree is that it is young, and looks young. It has a relatively straight trunk with no taper, and a number of large heavy branches that are too thick relative to the caliper of the trunk.

Typically, with a tree like this, you either stick it in the ground for several years and let it grow to develop caliper and taper, or else do something "more drastic" to style it as a shohin or mame. This would include either major trunk chops, or other dramatic trunk work like twisting, curling, etc.
 
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