Poor weather

CarpenterDiaz7

Sapling
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So for the next couple of days up here in New Hampshire we’ll be experiencing 45° and rain. I’ve brought out one my Japanese Maples and a quince I got over the weekend…

Question is would it be safe to keep them out in this weather as they are still new to me, and fairly delicate to cold winds. Or would be it bad to keep them in house 69° for a couple of days?

opinions welcome thank you all in advance!
 

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Shibui

Imperial Masterpiece
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Agree that both these are hardy and would be far better outside. Both are also tolerant of light frost, even with new shoots. Real cold is a different matter but that's not what the forecast you've given indicates.
Hopefully they are raised on a bench which also mitigates some of the cold problems. Substantially colder at ground level usually. Growers should also allow for local variations on temp. Cold accumulates in hollows and valleys which may be cooler than the general forecast while hillsides are often slightly warmer. Know your location to get a good grasp of how your back yard will be in relation to the general local forecast.
 

Taste

Mame
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Yeah you’re not going to worry about bringing in most trees until sub freezing temps. Look up some general
Care for each of your trees species.
 

rockm

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They should be outside unless temperatures dip below 35. Inside is a stressful environment. Dry air, very little air circulation can damage new leaves. Low light on developing leaves means they stand a chance of damage from more intense sunlight when placed back outside.
 

CarpenterDiaz7

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They should be outside unless temperatures dip below 35. Inside is a stressful environment. Dry air, very little air circulation can damage new leaves. Low light on developing leaves means they stand a chance of damage from more intense sunlight when placed back outside.
Thanks! I have one that’s sick, (there’s a thread) and I’ve been keeping it inside until temps are 50° consecutively, and it’s been getting LIFE back, so happy! But am glad you wrote that statement about the light inside vs outside damaging leafs, make sense. Would that also mean they can build up to it if I slowly introduce it to sunlight in about a week or so?
Pic for progress
 

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rockm

Spuds Moyogi
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Thanks! I have one that’s sick, (there’s a thread) and I’ve been keeping it inside until temps are 50° consecutively, and it’s been getting LIFE back, so happy! But am glad you wrote that statement about the light inside vs outside damaging leafs, make sense. Would that also mean they can build up to it if I slowly introduce it to sunlight in about a week or so?
Pic for progress
The "sick" tree should be outside as well as all the others. Inside conditions will make it weaker not stronger. Indoor conditions are not preferable to being outside, they are mostly the opposite. There are no "indoor" plants. Only plants that tolerate the dry, airless, dim conditions inside. Unless you have high-output Halide, or LED lighting set ups and dedicated indoor rooms with more than 50 percent humidity and strong fans to drive air circulation, you will gradually kill any temperate zone tree you keep inside.

The re-exposure to sunlight depends on how much time the tree has had indoors while pushing new leaves. If its' been only a few days, re-exposure doesn't really matter. If leaves have extensively developed over a week or more indoors, placing the trees in partial shade OUTSIDE initially for a few days will help.
 

CarpenterDiaz7

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The "sick" tree should be outside as well as all the others. Inside conditions will make it weaker not stronger. Indoor conditions are not preferable to being outside, they are mostly the opposite. There are no "indoor" plants. Only plants that tolerate the dry, airless, dim conditions inside. Unless you have high-output Halide, or LED lighting set ups and dedicated indoor rooms with more than 50 percent humidity and strong fans to drive air circulation, you will gradually kill any temperate zone tree you keep inside.

The re-exposure to sunlight depends on how much time the tree has had indoors while pushing new leaves. If its' been only a few days, re-exposure doesn't really matter. If leaves have extensively developed over a week or more indoors, placing the trees in partial shade OUTSIDE initially for a few days will help.
Appreciate you thanks!
 

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