Potential Buds on White Pine Bonsai?

BeebsBonsai

Shohin
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Hello all,

I have a white pine grafted onto a black pine base. I believe the variety I have is Vanderwolf's Pyramid. Apologies if I spelled that wrong.

Anyway, I am trying to get this tree to back-bud, as when I bought it last year it was youngish and had that typical lion's tail look. I have been pumping it with fertilizer and just letting it grow, being sure only to remove growth that would cause inverse taper. I have been patient and I think I am starting to see the fruits of that labor. I am looking to the more seasoned veterans to weigh in here. Here is what I have:

Along the trunk of this small tree, I am seeing some resinous white spots. There are four or five of them at bare spots on the trunk where I have really been hoping to foster some new buds. I am currently at work, but will be able to send some photos in as soon as I get home to show you guys. However, just from the description, is this typically what future buds look like when they are at their very early stages? Or, am I seeing something that could be detrimental to the tree? I.E. Resinous deposits from healing a small tear in the bark?

Again, you will have photos soon, but I have never seen nor can I find a pic online of what a pre-bud would look like. I was hoping some members had practical knowledge here
 

Wires_Guy_wires

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Resinous sounds bad. I'm in my first pine year, or at least the first year everything seems to survive and grow. Buds usually start off looking like green pimples, then increase in size and either form actual buds or straight up needles of a small size.

I haven't seen bleeding like you mention in none of the 6 species of pine I own (I have western white pine, but no eastern white pine like you do). Well, yes, I have seem the bleeding, but only on damaged bark.

I'm affraid it could be some kind of wood worm. They bore holes, which bleed.
 

BeebsBonsai

Shohin
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Resinous sounds bad. I'm in my first pine year, or at least the first year everything seems to survive and grow. Buds usually start off looking like green pimples, then increase in size and either form actual buds or straight up needles of a small size.

I haven't seen bleeding like you mention in none of the 6 species of pine I own (I have western white pine, but no eastern white pine like you do). Well, yes, I have seem the bleeding, but only on damaged bark.

I'm affraid it could be some kind of wood worm. They bore holes, which bleed.
I will get a photo tonight. I got engrossed in yard work yesterday and forgot to take one and upload it. I was worried about a potential parasite as well, which is why I asked the question. I do not notice any ill effects in the tree at all, which is why I did not jump to the conclusion of parasitic origin. I should post a photo at about 5 PM Central. I'll make it the first thing I do.
 

Wires_Guy_wires

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When taking close ups like this, it really helps to use a piece of paper behind the branch, so the focus doesn't auto-shift to the background.
It's hard to tell, but they don't seem like buds to me. Note that my knowledge on pines is very limited.
You could know for sure by scratching the resin off of one. If there's green, it was a bud. Is there's a hole, the tree will most likely not make it, judging from the amount of resin bumps.
But again, you might want to wait for a more experienced person to chime in.
 

Adair M

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I’m not familiar with that cultivar, so I looked it up.

I see no reason why it would make a good bonsai. Long, twisting needles. Grafted.
 

BeebsBonsai

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Adair, I appreciate the candor. I was new to the hobby, and the tree was cheap. I just wanted a pine. i am making the best of it. Do we think these could be borers or worms of some sort? I will do some investigative digging into one of them to see if there is a hold bored into the wood once the weather here gets a bit drier. I don't really want to open up the bark now since we are in a bit of a rainy spell for the next few days. Anyone have any ideas of what they could be.
 

BeebsBonsai

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Unfortunately, the pictures aren't really clear enough to say anything other then the fact that the white blobs are not buds.
Sorry, I couldn't keep myself steady. I have a the iphone 7 plus, so it's basically a tablet. I'll give it another shot tonight/tomorrow morning with the paper behind it as suggested.
 

Nybonsai12

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i can't see shit from the pictures but anytime i've had a white blob on my pine it was an adelgid or maybe the rare instance of dried crystallized sap
 

BeebsBonsai

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i can't see shit from the pictures but anytime i've had a white blob on my pine it was an adelgid or maybe the rare instance of dried crystallized sap
Insecticidal soap do the trick for the adelgid? The photos I found online looked similar.
 

Nybonsai12

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Insecticidal soap do the trick for the adelgid? The photos I found online looked similar.
it might. I haven't had them in years and can't recall what i used. I've used Bayer tree and shrub for most of my bug issues when i've had them with decent results. You may also want to see if you can just pick them off and squish them if there aren't that many.
 

BeebsBonsai

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I'll pick and squish and then give the trunk a good spray with my insecticidal soap. I have noticed some drooping candles and am now wondering if that is due to a reduced sap flow since these suckers are taking some of that away. Only a few droopers though. Strangest thing. Fully mature, not a spot of disease on them, they just droop. it's as if theyre too heavy for the branch.
 
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