Propagating aerial roots on ficus, trying something without knowing if that works, please suggest.

dvsrk563

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I'm trying to propagate aerial roots for my ficus, used some wet sphagnum moss wrapped around a portion on the extended trunk. I'm not sure if it is going to help or not and am I doing it right, could someone suggest.
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ShadyStump

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I was asking about this exact sort of thing a couple months ago. I'll see if I can dig it up in case you're interested in some of the thought folks gave there.

What sort of ficus is it? Tiger bark?
 

BrianBay9

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High humidity will get aerial roots started. I've also found that trees that are rootbound in their pots throw more aerial roots. Obviously you'll need to remove that wrap at some point and keep humidity high to keep them growing to the soil line. Some people put the tree in a terrarium set up. Some thread the growing root through a drinking straw and guide it to a particular spot. People in Florida just call it summer.
 

ShadyStump

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Found it.
Nothing spectacular, but maybe you'll catch something I didn't.

There was a suggestion to just use a dab of cut paste in a spot on the branch where you want one to start, then you'd have to do the straw trick or something like @BrianBay9 just mentioned.
 

sorce

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Are you talking air layer or aerial roots?

I just don't see the design potential in your current rig.

There is a difference in tissue between roots and aerial roots IMO.
If you start in wet and not humid, you may have to protect, not just guide it with a straw.

If you tuck it right outside the window there in amongst them plants and keep it watered every or twice a day, you'll get too many actual aerial roots.

Sorce
 

dvsrk563

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I was asking about this exact sort of thing a couple months ago. I'll see if I can dig it up in case you're interested in some of the thought folks gave there.

What sort of ficus is it? Tiger bark?
It is mentioned as Ficus microcarpa 'Golden Gate', got it from here but my version didn't come with aerial roots.
 

dvsrk563

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Thank you for your inputs. Based on all your responses it sounded like maintaining humidity is the key.
What if I keep the pot in this humidity tray with dome covered, I had similar one at home where I can control the temperature too, thinking of using it. do you see any issue/problem?
 

ShadyStump

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If the tree fits, and you can you can keep it in the right area to stay warm and humid, that should do it.
I'd make sure you have enough height inside for the tree to continue to grow while you're waiting on the the roots. You won't want to prune while trying to get any part of it to grow out.
 

LanceMac10

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Take it off after a week or two. Probably will have started to grow some. Problem is free-ing it from the sphagnum without breaking it. Do it early before they get too tangled.

Using the straw is about the only way to protect/guide it to the surface. Misting into the straw will help.

Works on surface roots as well.....breathable salad bag material....

DSC00091 (1).JPG
 

Ugo

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There was a suggestion to just use a dab of cut paste in a spot on the branch where you want one to start

Yes, I did more tests and it work perfectly.
I would even say that my results on the Tigerbark are more close to 90% to initiate aerial root.
I Apply paste on dry bark, but the solid tacky one not the "liquid" version of paste, spray water and kept the tree in high humidity and Im mostly sure I will have 1 or more roots emerging from the paste in the coming weeks.
That is if you want a root at a precise spot.

As @sorce mention its important to know if we talk about air layer or aerial roots as they are totally different.

For aerial roots I also tried to build a clear plastic tent covering only the pot and a part of the trunk where I wanted aerial roots, I kept the tent and trunk mostly wet for a fews days and aerials roots start emerging.

Now its pretty much the opposite, as aerial roots on branches doesnt go with my design I constantly have to take them off the tree as they tend to develop everywhere in no time at around 55% humidity +.

Hope it help!
Ugo
 

dvsrk563

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Yes, I did more tests and it work perfectly.
I would even say that my results on the Tigerbark are more close to 90% to initiate aerial root.
I Apply paste on dry bark, but the solid tacky one not the "liquid" version of paste, spray water and kept the tree in high humidity and Im mostly sure I will have 1 or more roots emerging from the paste in the coming weeks.
That is if you want a root at a precise spot.

As @sorce mention its important to know if we talk about air layer or aerial roots as they are totally different.

For aerial roots I also tried to build a clear plastic tent covering only the pot and a part of the trunk where I wanted aerial roots, I kept the tent and trunk mostly wet for a fews days and aerials roots start emerging.

Now its pretty much the opposite, as aerial roots on branches doesnt go with my design I constantly have to take them off the tree as they tend to develop everywhere in no time at around 55% humidity +.

Hope it help!
Ugo

Would you be able to share a link from Amazon for this "I Apply paste on dry bark, but the solid tacky one not the "liquid" version of paste"

Thanks
 

Ugo

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Would you be able to share a link from Amazon for this "I Apply paste on dry bark, but the solid tacky one not the "liquid" version of paste"

Thanks

Hi!

Yes!
I don't want to mix things up with terminology but I will call it ''cutting putty'' instead of a cutting paste as its more consistent.
I found the cutting putty to be quite ''hard'' to work with at first but once you get used to the application the putty resist pretty much anything.
In this case I use the conifer version on all my trees, it doesn't seems to affect deciduous, the putty doesn't affect my acers , azalea or conifers in any way except it seal, but used on a Ficus it seems to me that the level of humidity stays higher at the point where the putty has been applied, no light, no exposure to the elements, the tree react by putting out aerial root where its the easiest.

Here's a good example!
I used the putty to hold down an aerial root I wanted to guide along the trunk and a new root emerged from the place I applied putty.

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https://www.superflybonsai.com/products/cutpaste-brown-green-top-160g-jar
 

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