Prune an Air Layered Tree?

QuantumSparky

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Don't prune it, there isn't really any reason to do so. And then after it comes off it'll need to gain strength and get established before you can do anything with it as well
 
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Are there roots? Has it been separated?

If no, and no, then no. The growing tips provide the most auxins that signal root growth.
I can't see any roots yet (I really wont know until I open in up, it's been a month and half) and no it hasn't been separated.

but Roger than, I'll leave it.
 
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Don't prune it, there isn't really any reason to do so. And then after it comes off it'll need to gain strength and get established before you can do anything with it as well
I'm sorry, but how long have you been doing Bonsai? I appreciate your eagerness to help others, but come on man, you where just asking how to Air-Layer not even 2 months ago.

 
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Peter Chan in one of his videos recommended reducing the foliage on a separated air layer. I would guess there is conflicting mechanisms relevant here. You need the foliage to produce the auxin to stimulate root growth on the other hand with the small root capacity you would need to reduce foliage in proportion.
 

Wires_Guy_wires

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Separate it, wait for two days. If it wilts on day one or two, remove some foliage or simply cut leafs in half and re-examine for another day or two. If it stays turgid, keep the foliage to increase healing speed and rooting.

It's a case by case thing and depends a whole lot on how well the air layer has established on the mother tree. You only know that for sure when you separare the two.
 

Bonsai Nut

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Peter Chan in one of his videos recommended reducing the foliage on a separated air layer. I would guess there is conflicting mechanisms relevant here. You need the foliage to produce the auxin to stimulate root growth on the other hand with the small root capacity you would need to reduce foliage in proportion.
That's exactly the way you need to think about it. Some air-layers with lots of roots can handle lots of foliage... other air-layers with fewer roots you might have to reduce foliage. Ultimately you want to balance the roots strength with the foliage strength AFTER you separate. Prior to separation, you want as much foliage as possible.
 

QuantumSparky

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I'm sorry, but how long have you been doing Bonsai? I appreciate your eagerness to help others, but come on man, you where just asking how to Air-Layer not even 2 months ago.
I like the skepticism but the cool thing about information is that you can share it even if you aren't the one who discovered it :p You don't have to automatically take it as fact, because I'm definitely new to the hobby, but I have more experience asking noob questions here so would it not make sense that I've heard the answer to your question before? Perhaps I should have prefaced with a disclaimer but I've listened to smarter people than the two of us and simply relayed their advice. If you'll notice, the rest of the comments suggest the same.

Best of luck with the air layer!
 

sorce

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Pics!

Timeline?

Sorce
 
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I air layered it in two places in mid June,
Pics!

Timeline?

Sorce
I air layered it in two places in mid June. I used a pop bottle sliced in half with a hole for the top one and just surran wrap for the bottom one. I can see some roots starting to form on the bottom but can't see anything in the pop bottle. I used 50/50 potting mix and peat, as I couldn't find any spagnhum at the time.

IMG_20210808_114313.jpgIMG_20210808_114324.jpg

IMG_20210808_114340.jpg
 

sorce

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Since this is your plant and not a public area layer, I assume the end of the timeline is "when roots grow". Which would be appropriate and doable without much added winter protection.

In this case where you haven't enough roots to remove it and it is obviously alive and well, I would certainly DO the necessary pruning in order to keep a more ornery opposite species with good branch structure, or budding closer to or on the trunk, depending on future goals.

Though it may be a bit late to trigger new growth that may end up susceptible to winter damage.

Sorce

Sorce
 

RKMcGinnis

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That little layer at the bottom has thick roots it looks like comingoutofthe bag. Good sign it is ready to be cut. But if you cut it keep it in the shade. Looks ready to cut. But that bottom layer looks like a good ratio of leaves to roots without trimming. Hard call in a way, when I do late layers I usually leave on following spring. But I have very mild winters rather then the ones in Canada.
 

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