Prunus mume Zone 5

Mike423

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Hey everyone, I know most mume apricots are hardy to zone 6 but I was wondering has anyone tried growing them in zone 5? And if so with what results? I am looking to purchase some this next year and was wondering how they fair in a zone 5 winters. I could keep the indefinitely if I stored them in my garage with some of my other more sensitive trees but would like to grow some in ground so it doesn't take me two life times to get them more developed.
 

fredtruck

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I have one that I've had for six years, but I keep it in greenhouse-like conditions in the winter. My storage area is not heated, but it is birmed in so it never gets below 35 in the depths of winter.
 

coh

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I'd also be interested in hearing peoples experiences with growing prunus mume in the colder climates. I was under the impression that they were only hardy to zone 7. I bought one from forestfarm last year and their website states zone 7, so I figured I'd have to grow it in a pot and provide winter protection. Of course, I'd rather get it in the ground to get faster growth, but unless someone has done that successfully in zone 6, I'm not going to risk it. Anyone?

Chris
 

Dav4

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My understanding of ume is that they are quite winter hardy and are able to handle winter cold to 0 F or lower. The issue is that they awaken from winter dormancy as early as January, despite consistently cold winter temps, which in turn makes them more susceptable to late winter cold damage as they start to grow. I know they are winter hardy in the ground in usda zone 6, and the several I have have survived two relatively cold zone 7 winters here in GA. My only protection for them here in GA is being placed under the bench and mulching the pots with leaves. Despite early/mid January lows in the single digits, they always flower in late January or early February and push foliage by early to mid March.
 

coh

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Dave,

Thanks for sharing your experience. I have done some additional investigation and many sources do state they are hardy to zone 6. However...one source also stated they wouldn't grow north of New York City. And I don't think I've ever seen them in any garden up here, nor seen them offered at nurseries in the area.

For me, there's enough uncertainty that I'm not willing to risk planting my one ume in the ground unless someone who lives in my area can verify that they'll survive. Better yet, I guess I'll have to get another one to use as a test specimen...

Chris
 

Mike423

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I'm definitely planning on trying if not next winter then the following one. I will be buying a few at a decent price, so if one dies it wont be that big a loss. So I'll let you know what happens (If you care to wait that long).
 

Dav4

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Dave,

Thanks for sharing your experience. I have done some additional investigation and many sources do state they are hardy to zone 6. However...one source also stated they wouldn't grow north of New York City. And I don't think I've ever seen them in any garden up here, nor seen them offered at nurseries in the area.

I purchased 4 ume seedlings from evergreen gardenworks and planted them out in my yard in SE MA, usda zone 6. They survived 2 winters there before moving to warmer southern climes:D. I agree that I have never seen them growing in a northeast garden...I suspect it is because they never have flowers there due to the cold. I also wouldn't plant out your one ume in Rochester, though, I bet you could grow one out in a relatively protected location in your yard. Ultimately, you only care about woody growth and not flowers, and these trees really grow fast when planted in the ground. I might give it a go with some cheaper stock.
 

Dav4

Drop Branch Murphy
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Hey everyone, I know most mume apricots are hardy to zone 6 but I was wondering has anyone tried growing them in zone 5? And if so with what results? I am looking to purchase some this next year and was wondering how they fair in a zone 5 winters. I could keep the indefinitely if I stored them in my garage with some of my other more sensitive trees but would like to grow some in ground so it doesn't take me two life times to get them more developed.

I'd even try them up there in frigid zone 5...
 

coh

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Dave,

Thanks for the additional info. Good to know they did well in SE Mass. Of course, as you imply, SE Mass zone 6 is not quite the same as western NY zone 6! We are buffered by the lakes but still get down to -10 F or a bit lower a couple of times each winter, along with numerous other nights near/below 0 F. I will probably get another plant to test in the ground. Don't care about flowering during the growing out stage, though it would be a nice bonus.

Chris
 

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