Quercus Suber seedlings, what now?

Fonz

Chumono
Messages
514
Reaction score
904
Location
Pulderbos, Belgium
USDA Zone
8b
So I ordered myself some Cork Oak acorns last fall and planted them this spring. The little guys are doing great so far. I'm planning on putting them in seperate pots later this fall.
Now my question is if there's anything I should do (besides letting them grow ofcourse) to get them ready for a life as potted trees. Cutting taproots, putting some movement in the trunk(s), etc...
Anyone got some experience with this species?

P1050149.JPG
 

Tieball

Omono
Messages
1,961
Reaction score
1,699
Location
Michigan. 6a
USDA Zone
6a
No specific experience with these trees. However, I’d plant them at a significant angle...not straight up. I’d build in some curves now....lower trunks harden fast. At this stage a nice hard curve can be created by the planting angle and a removal of branches going straight up. It will recover quickly. The hard curve will soften out as the tree grows.

I’d set aside a couple of them, plant on that angle and start regular clipping so volumes of buds are produced...from those buds some nice directional angles can be selected. Other buds...I’d let them grow to create lots of irregularities, future hollows and general rugged growth characteristics. I just wouldn’t want my trunks to be smooth and plain looking. Gnarled up well is good.

You should begin the early process of shortening the tap root before it’s out of control and all you have. I have severely cut off tap roots on seedling trees I work with.

You have some really nice healthy growth started. Well done!
 

BrianBay9

Omono
Messages
1,209
Reaction score
1,657
Location
Marina, CA
USDA Zone
10a
Shorten the tap root when you pot up. Get some movement low on the trunks then let them go with no pruning to bulk up and eventually cork up. You'll be surprised how soon you start to get that wonderful bark they're known for.
 

Potawatomi13

Masterpiece
Messages
2,956
Reaction score
1,851
Location
Eugene, OR
USDA Zone
8
Also consider use of bends in upper tap root as part of trunk. Not all are straight. And could cut back to 1st or 2nd branch for more movement. As you see these can grow pretty vigorously;). Possibilities abound. Have fun.
 

Fonz

Chumono
Messages
514
Reaction score
904
Location
Pulderbos, Belgium
USDA Zone
8b
Since winter is coming, can they stay outside? I've been told they can handle mild freezing temperatures.
And when would be a good time to move them into seperate containers?
 
Messages
1,919
Reaction score
2,748
Location
Netherlands
They seem to be hardy to -22C. So outside should be good.
I'm going to get a few of these too. I'll repot them the same time I do with Quercus robur; the first half of spring. I've killed enough robur and ilex to know that repotting oaks in summer is not my thing.
 

Leo in N E Illinois

Imperial Masterpiece
Messages
6,035
Reaction score
10,680
Location
on the IL-WI border, a mile from ''da Lake''
USDA Zone
5b
They seem to be hardy to -22C. So outside should be good.
I'm going to get a few of these too. I'll repot them the same time I do with Quercus robur; the first half of spring. I've killed enough robur and ilex to know that repotting oaks in summer is not my thing.
-22 C ?????? I though the OP was talking about Quercus suber, not Quercus robur.

Suber is the Mediterranean cork oak. To my knowledge not found anywhere it gets cold enough for the ground to freeze. I would not expose the Q. suber to temperatures below -5 C. and preferably try to keep them at or above freezing.
 

Fonz

Chumono
Messages
514
Reaction score
904
Location
Pulderbos, Belgium
USDA Zone
8b
-22 C ?????? I though the OP was talking about Quercus suber, not Quercus robur.

Suber is the Mediterranean cork oak. To my knowledge not found anywhere it gets cold enough for the ground to freeze. I would not expose the Q. suber to temperatures below -5 C. and preferably try to keep them at or above freezing.
Hey Leo, thanx for the reply. I did hear recently that Q. Suber thrives much better in my (well not really mine but you know what I mean) climate than in it's original climate. Here it grows year round, except for winter ofcourse, while in the mediterenean area it grows only in spring and fall. Not sure if that makes sense but the guy I heard it from is rather a big name here in Belgium. None the less I'll protect the seedlings from freezing temperatures below -5°C/23°F (I really wished you guys would stop using that funky temperature scale :D ).
 
Messages
1,919
Reaction score
2,748
Location
Netherlands
-22 C ?????? I though the OP was talking about Quercus suber, not Quercus robur.

Suber is the Mediterranean cork oak. To my knowledge not found anywhere it gets cold enough for the ground to freeze. I would not expose the Q. suber to temperatures below -5 C. and preferably try to keep them at or above freezing.
The link I posted is for a store that sells them from our region. They probably know what they're doing with their stock, and they're advertising it as a pretty hardy plant. I've seen adult trees that have survived those kind of frosts too, they were in steel containers that should freeze entirely during winter.
 

Potawatomi13

Masterpiece
Messages
2,956
Reaction score
1,851
Location
Eugene, OR
USDA Zone
8
Cutting taproots, putting some movement in the trunk(s), etc...
Do it:cool:.
Also as to climate they ground grow here(have seen a couple)but protect roots from freezing of in pot;).
 
Last edited:

rodeolthr

Mame
Messages
118
Reaction score
94
Location
Seattle, WA
USDA Zone
8a
We are able to grow Quercus suber outdoors in the Seattle area. We are zone 8b. We usually have an annual winter cold spell where nighttime temperatures get down around 15F (-9C) for several days to a couple weeks. There is one of some size in the Washington Park Arboretum. They seem to do fine, though of course would like more summer heat.
 

PieterVE

Seedling
Messages
11
Reaction score
5
Location
Ghoy, Belgium
USDA Zone
8
So I ordered myself some Cork Oak acorns last fall and planted them this spring. The little guys are doing great so far. I'm planning on putting them in seperate pots later this fall.
Hi, where did you order them from ?
Would it be too late to order some now, and plant them once received ?
 

Potawatomi13

Masterpiece
Messages
2,956
Reaction score
1,851
Location
Eugene, OR
USDA Zone
8
Hi, where did you order them from ?
Would it be too late to order some now, and plant them once received ?
Should be fine and will grow in Spring as would in nature. If soil not too cold root likely will be growing after a month in ground;).
 

Fonz

Chumono
Messages
514
Reaction score
904
Location
Pulderbos, Belgium
USDA Zone
8b
Hi, where did you order them from ?
Would it be too late to order some now, and plant them once received ?
I ordered them from https://www.treeseedonline.com but I can't find them there anymore. Maybe you should email them. Last year that worked for me :)
It's not too late to plant them now.
 

Similar threads


Top Bottom