Question about Bonsai Pots with a rim?

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#1
Things freeze here in the winter and I have recently bought a 19'' rectangular pot. My question is to those who live in a climate with an extended winter freeze, do pots with an overhanging rim tend to crack? I am starting to think I will not keep the pot because of this reason. If this one doesn't work any suggestions on what pot to get for this tree along with where to get it?
 

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Cypress187

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#2
It looks curved in the last picture and not sharp edged, I think the soil will compress a little and bulge out. I don't it will break, but I don't have such a pot and it's not that cold here. What's wrong with the dish tub in the second picture?

Oh yeah, aren't u afraid of loosing an eye or get impaled with that huge jin? :D
 
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#4
It looks curved in the last picture and not sharp edged, I think the soil will compress a little and bulge out. I don't it will break, but I don't have such a pot and it's not that cold here. What's wrong with the dish tub in the second picture?

Oh yeah, aren't u afraid of loosing an eye or get impaled with that huge jin? :D
Haha! Yeah I keep running into that Jin walking by. My wife is always cursing it too. I'm about to cut it back....maybe. Also your right it's a beautiful plastic tub isn't it, it's even cracked so I had to make a wooden carry around deal.

I hope I can make this pot work but I don't want to have to repot it after the first winter in the new pot.
 
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#7
It will also make a future repot a challenge as the roots will grow out to the size of the container and will be difficult to remove past the rim. You'll likely have to cut or risk damaging roots when you do.
 

rockm

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#8
I would be very cautious about using this pot in your climate. It might be OK in freezes in higher zones, like zone 7 or so, where low temps aren't as intense and there are longer thawing periods between freezes. Long-term, deep cold causes frost heaves in the ground and in pots. It may, or may not, be OK.

One way to overwinter if you like the pot, is to remove the tree from it and mulch the tree into a protected area and store the pot separately. Won't hurt the tree, but may save the pot.
 
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It will also make a future repot a challenge as the roots will grow out to the size of the container and will be difficult to remove past the rim. You'll likely have to cut or risk damaging roots when you do.
Sorry I'm not totally following you, what are you suggesting? Are you saying the bin I put it in was maybe to big after collection?
 

rockm

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#10
Incurved rimmed pots require you to remove the root mass underneath the interior overhang to get the tree out of the pot at repotting time. That can mean cutting down through the root mass from the interior edge to the bottom of the pot all the way around the rim to avoid mangling the roots or breaking the pot when you're pulling the tree out of the container. If you don't, the root mass is too wide to get through the smaller top opening. This sounds confusing, think plug in a drain...
 
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#11
ohhhh that makes sense thanks for the help. Another reason not to use. Any suggestions on where to find a nice pot for this? I think I will sell the one that I have.
 

rockm

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ohhhh that makes sense thanks for the help. Another reason not to use. Any suggestions on where to find a nice pot for this? I think I will sell the one that I have.
I really like that pot with the tree. It's doable, if you know what's required to use it. I don't think its a deal breaker, unless you just don't want the extra hassle.
 

Adair M

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#14
That's not much of a lip. I wouldn't worry about it.

Now, if it were a bag style pot, that may make a difference.

Repotting, use a sickle. Yes, you do damage the roots right at the rim. No big deal. You're going to cut them off anyway.
 
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#15
In spite of the problems that have been pointed out, that is a unique and very cool pot. I'd vote for giving it a try next spring but make sure that the soil level around the edge is a quarter of a inch or so below that rim (at least before you put in to bed for the winter). The top of the soil will freeze first and if it is locked in by that rim, when the rest freezes it will likely crack the pot. It happened to a pot of mine once.
 

Adair M

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#18
In spite of the problems that have been pointed out, that is a unique and very cool pot. I'd vote for giving it a try next spring but make sure that the soil level around the edge is a quarter of a inch or so below that rim (at least before you put in to bed for the winter). The top of the soil will freeze first and if it is locked in by that rim, when the rest freezes it will likely crack the pot. It happened to a pot of mine once.
Indeed. There should not not be soil at the top 1/4 inch of the rim anyway. That last 1/4 inch is used to hold the moss when you want to show. Otherwise, the soil level (and it should be level!) should be about 1/4 inch below the rim.
 

Stickroot

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#19
You could always ask @Stickroot to make you a stainless steel one. :)
That's not much of a lip. I wouldn't worry about it.

Now, if it were a bag style pot, that may make a difference.

Repotting, use a sickle. Yes, you do damage the roots right at the rim. No big deal. You're going to cut them off anyway.
As much as I would love to make s SS pot for you... I have to agree with @Adair M if that is even decent earthen or stoneware it will be fine. As far as repotting I would go around the edge with a potting knife and be closer to done with the roots.
Doubt if you will find anything of size or quality on the .99 thing, but you never know!
 
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#20
Pots like this are special but winter fragile. Once the tree becomes root bound there is the risk the freezing and the nature of the root mass can exert more strain on the pot than it can handle. If your pots are fired almost to the level of being porceline they will probably be OK, but many Chinese pots are not fired that hot and tend to break up after a winter or two. The best thing you can do is remove the tree from the pot if the roots have filled the pot but not ready for repotting by slipping the tree out of the pot and store it in a safe location. As how to remove trees from a pot with an inward hanging edge: Use a tilers knife, this can be sharpened so as to cut that outer portion of the root mass that is wedged in the potl
 

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