quince rust

badatusernames

Chumono
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before i take action - this is rust and must be removed and burned correct?

this is a japanese quince which i know are prone to fungal issues. i was late in putting infuse on it, but it recently got that systemic on it as well as clearys on it a bit ago


IKRWdyB.jpg
 

River's Edge

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I would concur it appears to be a fungal issue! I would just observe and remove only the most badly affected leaves. Systemics take a while to show their effectiveness in the new leaves that should show no sign of fungal damage as they emerge and grow! Sometimes the first sign is leaves that are not getting progressively worse. isolate the plant while observing to prevent issues with other plants. Water the soil not the leaves while dealing with this issue. This is not a bad practice to keep when dealing with species that are prone to fungal issues.
I cannot say for sure that it is or is not a form of rust on the basis of the picture, perhaps others can. I suspect due to the nature of fungal infections and there similar appearances under certain conditions one could only know for sure with a laboratory diagnosis.
 

River's Edge

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Am I the only one who sees white possibly pests or something on the foliage?
Saw it , discarded it as part of the problem!
One of the difficulties is that several fungal issues can appear the same. For example it could be leaf spot that starts with reddish spots that develop a yellow centre. Rust spores are more evident on the surface normally, particularly on the twigs and fruit. The products you have used typically attack a broad spectrum of fungal issues so I would tend to be patient at this point. I had a similar but more extensive issue with princess persimmon in the early spring last year! Within three weeks infuse granules had it under control. I simply removed the badly affected leaves and watered the soil without wetting the foliage. The other step I would consider in the future is adapting soil mix to ensure better drainage and unsaturated growing condition for quince as they are very susceptible to fungal issues. For my Chojubai and Toyo Nishiki improved, as well as persimmon I have switched to lower amounts of Akadama, increasing pumice and lava to create a bit drier mix. I also ensure they are in a bit deeper containers to foster better root growth and more stable moisture levels!
Others may find it easier to simply adjust their watering patterns or locations the plants are kept in.
 

badatusernames

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I would concur it appears to be a fungal issue! I would just observe and remove only the most badly affected leaves. Systemics take a while to show their effectiveness in the new leaves that should show no sign of fungal damage as they emerge and grow! Sometimes the first sign is leaves that are not getting progressively worse. isolate the plant while observing to prevent issues with other plants. Water the soil not the leaves while dealing with this issue. This is not a bad practice to keep when dealing with species that are prone to fungal issues.
I cannot say for sure that it is or is not a form of rust on the basis of the picture, perhaps others can. I suspect due to the nature of fungal infections and there similar appearances under certain conditions one could only know for sure with a laboratory diagnosis.
Saw it , discarded it as part of the problem!
One of the difficulties is that several fungal issues can appear the same. For example it could be leaf spot that starts with reddish spots that develop a yellow centre. Rust spores are more evident on the surface normally, particularly on the twigs and fruit. The products you have used typically attack a broad spectrum of fungal issues so I would tend to be patient at this point. I had a similar but more extensive issue with princess persimmon in the early spring last year! Within three weeks infuse granules had it under control. I simply removed the badly affected leaves and watered the soil without wetting the foliage. The other step I would consider in the future is adapting soil mix to ensure better drainage and unsaturated growing condition for quince as they are very susceptible to fungal issues. For my Chojubai and Toyo Nishiki improved, as well as persimmon I have switched to lower amounts of Akadama, increasing pumice and lava to create a bit drier mix. I also ensure they are in a bit deeper containers to foster better root growth and more stable moisture levels!
thank you! this makes sense. I’ve removed the leaves for now.

i was wondering about the why of deeper pots for these and i guess i found out!
 

River's Edge

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thank you! this makes sense. I’ve removed the leaves for now.

i was wondering about the why of deeper pots for these and i guess i found out!
Some species take longer to generate root structure and do not do well when repotted frequently! A bit deeper pots aid in both these circumstances. This is a critical factor in propagation for species that are slow to differentiate root structure as it goes against the normal nursery practice of frequently potting up and using only the size needed for the short term. In fact Quince do much better if slightly over potted and disturbed less often.
 

badatusernames

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Some species take longer to generate root structure and do not do well when repotted frequently! A bit deeper pots aid in both these circumstances. This is a critical factor in propagation for species that are slow to differentiate root structure as it goes against the normal nursery practice of frequently potting up and using only the size needed for the short term. In fact Quince do much better if slightly over potted and disturbed less often.

thats great to know, thank you! I am hopeful it will pull through. It is not a deep pot, though it is quite wide for the size of the rootball when I put it in as its a bit of an exploding clump
 

badatusernames

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cuI3lye.jpg



with all the impacted leaves removed and moved to a spot it wont get poured on for the next three days straight
 

Cofga

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I treat my quince, hawthorn, junipers with Infuse, Daconil, Cleary’s to keep rust at bay. Once in a tree it seems you can only control it but never completely get rid of it.
 

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