Rain cover for saplings?

SevenOaks

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Perhaps more "nut" than bonsai :) ... but I woke suddenly last night, hearing heavy rainfall outside the window. It was pouring buckets, thunder and lightning galore.

Me: Oh no, my oaklings! To the rescue!

On with rain gear and running barefoot outdoors I managed to get the seven oakling fellows indoors. This summer has been a lot of checking the skies and running here and there, trying to save them from downpours. Luckily I don't have 50 trees (yet) ...

What would be an easy solution to be able to keep the trees outdoors and out of the worst rain?
 

Shibui

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Oak seedlings in the wild (mostly) survive rain events. Why do yours need so much attention? Most bonsai, including seedlings, manage through sun, wind and rain without constantly changing location.

If the problem is rain washing the soil out of the pots you should look at change of soil or some sort of mulch to protect the soil from heavy water. many growers add a topping pf pebbles to stop water washing the soil away.
If the problem is soil getting too wet you should look at changing soil mix to cope with added water.
If the problem is you are just nervous that's something you need to deal with yourself.
 

Bonsai Nut

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I have never worried about trees and rain unless there is hail. Now that I have moved to North Carolina I have to be a little more worried about falling branches or trees (falling into the garden area). But rain drops? No.
 

leatherback

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Oak seedlings in the wild (mostly) survive rain events. Why do yours need so much attention? Most bonsai, including seedlings, manage through sun, wind and rain without constantly changing location.

If the problem is rain washing the soil out of the pots you should look at change of soil or some sort of mulch to protect the soil from heavy water. many growers add a topping pf pebbles to stop water washing the soil away.
If the problem is soil getting too wet you should look at changing soil mix to cope with added water.
If the problem is you are just nervous that's something you need to deal with yourself.
What he said
 

hinmo24t

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I just dealt w 24 hours of rain. 3" rainfall. Only moved a few succulents under breezeway and figs in garage half way thru the event. I'd not worry about oaks out in rain tho

Good late night dedication btw
 

cmeg1

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I noticed trees undercover can get molds on the leaves gray molds and such of rain regular rain seems to wash them clean
 

Bonsai Nut

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We could use a little of that rain. Nowhere near as bad as the West Coast, but we have had an unusually dry summer here in NC. Yesterday it was even low humidity, high of 82, sunny. Scary.
 

hinmo24t

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OP, leave those oaks out and someone had a good point with top dressing. i might have to add some of that with a bunch of stones my mom gave me from a bamboo vase setup soon. my jade forest got hammered with rain/ took .5" soil off the top and the pot is only 3" tall

We could use a little of that rain. Nowhere near as bad as the West Coast, but we have had an unusually dry summer here in NC. Yesterday it was even low humidity, high of 82, sunny. Scary.
im a fan of millennial gardener on youtube. hes from coastal NC and usually complains of the rain and humidity for his figs and tomato. good luck with the conditions down there. you enjoying living in NC? ive heard good things

been a wet summer up here in MA, for instance i have watered all my trees about twice in the last month, with temps in 80s and 90s.
been a thunderstorm or rain every other day.

I noticed trees undercover can get molds on the leaves gray molds and such of rain regular rain seems to wash them clean
good point. im getting strong results from protecting some plants from rain (my shelf system, maples, etc. dont stay out in the rain in 4" pots) under this breezeway. i mist those 1 or 2 a day with rainwater. airflow is important though so you have a good point. i think it depends on the cover but stagnant air/water is a no no

breezeway and working on front garden maple
20210610_095637.jpg
 

Maiden69

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I use moss on most trees now, but I have also use large size kiryu during a heavy rain season. It prevents the small particles from moving around when watering.6E01D055-CD1F-494F-AF46-1B8DBEB69A76.jpeg
 

SevenOaks

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Thanks everyone for the suggestions! As @Shibui says, perhaps I have to work on my beginners' mind. :) I'll look into kiryu or moss to mitigate any risk of soil moving too much. I have had a good few leaves with rust spots and mildew - which I assume is from the leaves being wet for too long (several days rain and soggy weather). Perhaps I should just leave them ugly and let the trees themselves sort that out.

As an aside: the soil is of two varieties, one much finer propagation soil (those oak grow well and thrive). The other is a coarser mix of acadama, lava and something called alumina - perhaps clay? The oak in this soil do struggle, i.e. grow very slowly if at all, given the same outdoor conditions, watering and fertilization.
 
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leatherback

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Thanks everyone for the suggestions! As @Shibui says, perhaps I have to work on my beginners' mind. :) I'll look into kiryu or moss to mitigate any risk of soil moving too much. I have had a good few leaves with rust spots and mildew - which I assume is from the leaves being wet for too long (several days rain and soggy weather). Perhaps I should just leave them ugly and let the trees themselves sort that out.

As an aside: the soil is of two varieties, one much finer propagation soil (those oak grow well and thrive). The other is a coarser mix of acadama, lava and something called alumina - perhaps clay? The oak in this soil do struggle, i.e. grow very slowly if at all, given the same outdoor conditions, watering and fertilization.
I find akadama really reduces growth on my trees. I do not use it anymore. I use more stable ingredients. Look into a mix of bims and boncoco. If you have the time.. Drop by at bonsai werkstatt dusseldorf. It is a bit away from you, but well worth a visit.

Put the oaks in a well-ventilated spot, full sun (Will come again later this week). Spraying with diluted milk will help agains the mildew.
 

SevenOaks

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Thanks for the suggestions! I was thinking of repotting them in something less heavy next time around. I think the other propagation soil is partly made up out of boncoco. Always wanted to go to Dusseldorf, so I may make the trip some time in the future.

The oaklings are in the most sunny spot (south and pretty much always a bit of wind) so I guess they'll survive. Good call on that diluted milk, have to try that out.
 

leatherback

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are you in facebook? Check the events from group Bonsai Treff:

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