reciprocating saw or chainsaw??

barrosinc

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If you could buy one for yamadori trips... which one would it be?
 

Poink88

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I've used both a lot but never heard anyone use a chainsaw in dirt. In theory it may sound like a good idea but it is an accident waiting to happen...not to mention that your chain will be dull the second it touches dirt. Dirt will eat up your chain, bar, and possibly your motor. Good if that is it,but you can also lose your eyesight, arm, and leg...not kidding.

For yamadori, a good battery recip saw works great but a good pruning saw, a sharp heavy duty trenching shovel, lopper, and pick mattock may be all you need. I am planning on adding a (San Angelo) digging bar (with one wide end to cut roots) to my yamadori tool arsenal. ;)
 

M. Frary

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I've used a chainsaw a time or two to collect trees. Great for making the cuts above ground. Not so great in the dirt as Dario says. The reciprocating saw blades are cheaper than chains. Chains can be sharpened but it takes a few minutes.
I'm buying a reciprocating saw just for digging trees. Right now I use a hand saw.
 

barrosinc

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So reciprocating saw it is... thanks a lot!
That come along thing seems like a good idea.
 

Poink88

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That come along thing seems like a good idea.
It is but note that it is also a fast way to destroy a tree if you do not know what you are doing. Proceed with caution...protect and watch the tree.
 

dick benbow

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There's a relatively new battery powered saw that's small, light weight, yet powerful. was used in a recent trip to Wyoming and worked perfectly. :)
 

Wee

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I really like the "come-a-long" idea....I got my Dad with that one when I dug the Yaupons....I called him up and said come along lets spend some quality father/son time today.

The largest pruning shears you can find work real well for cutting large roots. Mine only have 24" handles but I would like to have some even bigger, also one of the super heavy duty flat nose shovels seems like a good idea but they ain't cheap....Ones I have priced are $100 plus.

Brian
 

lordy

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This is the shovel I use. And a battery-powered recip. saw.

http://www.qvc.com/Spear-Head-Gardening-Shovel-&-Spade.product.M27353.html?sc=M27353-SRCH&cm_sp=VIEWPOSITION-_-1-_-M27353&catentryImage=http://images.qvc.com/is/image/m/53/m27353.001?$uslarge$
 

barrosinc

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thanks for all the tips!!
I'm off to get olives and elms this weekend! I depend on my friend... but seems like we are going!
 

Trenthany

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bunjin

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I use an oscillating multi-tool with a coarse blade for my Niwaki and even larger bonsai. Makes very accurate cuts without much vibration in tight areas and will cut a fairly large branch or trunk. I had one for years before I discovered that it is incredibly useful for pruning.
 
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