red chojubai - from nursery pot

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figured i’d start a thread. not much to share yet but i’m curious if i should prune the new growth or just let it go nuts this year.

i feel like there’s perhaps a cascading clump in here somewhere, but we shall see!


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I'm keeping it in full sun and feeding it with Gro-Power 10-8-8, Biogold, and Hanasaku.

I noticed yellowing leaves today and got a little nervous after my other quince had a fungus issue pop up, but then found this


it's been in the 90s lately so that's good!
 

Leo in N E Illinois

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The cycles of letting it grow out and then cutting back hard are what give these character. Y ou have a number of long straight branches. Sometime this summer, probably before middle of August, cut back hard, leaving no long straight branches. Then let grow out until next summer. Repeat. it will develop character in no time.
 

River's Edge

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And if you can remember to do it, wire the first few inches of new growth early on for movement to establish some design as you go through the process of grow out, cut back. The entire design does not have to be clip and grow straight sections. If you check out Michael's Chojubai on his website, the carefully developed movement is readily apparent. By developing the clump or design a few inches at a time one can eliminate the thorns as well.
 
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awesome thanks for the tips! i wasn’t sure if i should cut back hard or just prune the branch tips to encourage back budding, I appreciate the insight and the wiring suggestion!
 

August44

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The cycles of letting it grow out and then cutting back hard are what give these character. Y ou have a number of long straight branches. Sometime this summer, probably before middle of August, cut back hard, leaving no long straight branches. Then let grow out until next summer. Repeat. it will develop character in no time.
Hi Leo, when you say let it grow out and then cut back hard, does that mean cutting back to the main branch/trunk or leaving a stub? Thanks!
 

Leo in N E Illinois

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Hi Leo, when you say let it grow out and then cut back hard, does that mean cutting back to the main branch/trunk or leaving a stub? Thanks!

I mean leave at least 2 or 3 nodes, so leave more than a stub. You want branches to develop. If you cut right back to the trunk, you will have - a stick in a pot. You need branches. Cutting back to leave at least 2 or 3 buds means the short branch branches into 2 or 3 more branches, let these grow out, then cut them back to 2 or 3 buds, then let them grow out. Branches will then have branches with branches. This is called ramification.

You want to develop a branch pattern. The branches should be shorter and more fine as you get further from the trunk. Look at winter silhouettes of trees.
 

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