Red Maples (Acer rubrum) waking up.

Jay Wilson

Shohin
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Here is a Red maple I've been growing for a few years. (First pic)
I love the new leaves when they start opening up in the spring. (second pic)

I almost put this one in a bonsai pot this spring, but I deciced to do a little more root (nebari) work and put it back in this screen bottom box.

The last picture is of a couple of thread grafts I did on another red maple. It looks like I'll be able to cut them loose by summer.
 

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Bill S

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Cool Jay, do you find the leaves reduce well on these, I have them growing all over the place.
Nice foliage when new and in the fall too.

will you cut it away completely this summer, or do the half and half( for lack of better words) cuts. I seem to remember that after getting the swelling that "joins" the 2 parts, you cut away /slit the bark and cambium 1/2 way around on the donor side, see if it stays alive, then finish the separation.
 

Jay Wilson

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Hello Bill,
I managed to reduce the leaves some last year on this one by pinching the new growth and a defoliation. I hope to do better this year. There were a couple of good threads here last year on reducing Acer rubrum leaves....

On the thread grafts, I do like to take the safe road and just partially cut the donor side as you describe. I've had successful thread grafts on willow oaks but this is the first time trying it on red maples. I've read that they take easily.
 

RyanFrye

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Nice Jay. Thanks for posting this. I'm always interested to hear other people's experiences with Acer Rubrum. I'm still not fully convinced that they make good bonsai because of the branching and leaf issues.
 

davetree

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I have read that Florida red maples can have some variation, with smaller leaves and more twiggy growth. The red maples here have giant leaves and nodes a foot apart. Is yours a standard Acer rubrum ?

How big is your tree ? You have done a pretty nice job with it.
 

pjkatich

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Jay,

I think a nice round pot would work with this tree.

It has been my experience that Acer rubrum need a slightly deeper pot to maintain their vigor. After two years in a bonsai pot, their health will start to decline. Every third year I return mine to a larger container and let a few branches grow a little long to give the tree some reserve energy.

I have taken the liberty to do a couple virts for your viewing pleasure.

Regards,
Paul
 

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Jay Wilson

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I have read that Florida red maples can have some variation, with smaller leaves and more twiggy growth. The red maples here have giant leaves and nodes a foot apart. Is yours a standard Acer rubrum ?

How big is your tree ? You have done a pretty nice job with it.

Hello Dave,
Yes , the red maples around here do have quite a variation in leaf size and internodes...also a lot of variation in color as well.
I have one in my yard with leaves that average one inch on twiggy branches. Unfourtunatly, it gets no color to speak of. Right next to it is a tree that has beautiful reds and orange color, but the leaves and internodes are much larger.

This tree is about 14 inches from the soil to the top.
It has been with me through most of my learning years and it shows. Full of scars and things that just aren't quite right. It is starting to look more like a bonsai and in a few more years it might actually be showable.

Acer rubrums are another one of those trees that are iffy as bonsai. If you find the right stock and put the time into it you may end up with an acceptable bonsai. Then again, you may not.....
 

Jay Wilson

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Jay,

I think a nice round pot would work with this tree.

It has been my experience that Acer rubrum need a slightly deeper pot to maintain their vigor. After two years in a bonsai pot, their health will start to decline. Every third year I return mine to a larger container and let a few branches grow a little long to give the tree some reserve energy.

I have taken the liberty to do a couple virts for your viewing pleasure.

Regards,
Paul


Hey Paul,
Thanks for the virts.... I like the second pot a bit more than the first. Maybe next spring I'll get it in a nice pot like that.

It's good to hear about your experiences with pot size for red maples. I had almost come to the same conclusion myself. They just didn't do as well for me in small pots as they do in larger ones, but my thinking hadn't taken the next logical step of putting them in a larger pot every couple of years the help them regain strength. Thanks!
 

Corrado

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Mine actually flowers the red with yellow insides. I love them.I see no reason why the leaves cannot reduce .They aren't a large maple leaf to start with compared to other US types.
 

just.wing.it

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Mine actually flowers the red with yellow insides. I love them.I see no reason why the leaves cannot reduce .They aren't a large maple leaf to start with compared to other US types.
You dug this gem out of the trenches, didn't you!

That's maybe the best Acer Rubrum Bonsai I've ever seen.
I want to try one sooo bad!
Gotta go find a good one...
 

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