Red oak acorns test

dvsrk563

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Hi,

I ordered red oak acorns from etsy and when I did a float test I see all of them floating. While checking online resources if the acorns float then they are bad, can some share your thoughts about it. I don't see any particular holes on it though. Attached is the picture.

Thank you.
 

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Wires_Guy_wires

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Most acorns have a layer of air inside of them that gets pushed out as soon as the "embryo" starts getting hydrated. I would wait for a couple days and re-assess.
 

Potawatomi13

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Plant em and you'll get 6 Oak trees. Mark my words! Protect from Squirrels or you will get ZERO.
 

dvsrk563

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Great, thank you for your inputs and building some confidence in me 😊 🌱
 

Shibui

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Agree that most acorns that have been dry for a while will float even though they are still viable. Just plant them. You have nothing to lose by planting.

I am told that acorns do not retain viability long when stored dry. Best germination will be from fresh seed. Only purchase from vendors who can guarantee the seed is fresh and viable and has not been stored for longer than a few months.
 

Tieball

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I imagine squirrels bury acorns in the ground a few inches so the acorns stay cool, moistened and nut-ready for harvest later….if the squirrels remember where they planted the acorns. Dried acorns would taste terrible.

Floating acorns can be insect infested and dry-rotted inside.
 

Shibui

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Even without squirrels acorns drop before the leaves then fallen leaves cover them and provide a damp blanket where they can germinate.
Many acorns are high in tannins so taste terrible. Adaptation by the trees to try to reserve some seed for germination I guess.
Some species are lower in tannin and are better for feed. Acorns generally have very high calorific value. It is even thought that the high quality of jamón ibérico de bellota, a ham made in Iberia from pigs fed on a diet of acorns (and considered by many to be one of the finest hams in the world), is due to the high level of antioxidants in the acorns, which help to prevent lipid oxidation.
In some cultures and times acorns have been a staple food. Tannins are leached out of the nut meat in running water or by boiling in several changes of water. The result is nutritious food. Acorns appear to have been a major food source for native peoples of California and probably other parts of the Americas an a few other parts of the world.
Some species have low enough tannin levels to be OK for human consumption without treatment. I believe that the 'white' oaks have lowest tannin levels.
Acorns also yield oil and can be ground to flour for cooking.
Even sprouted acorns can be eaten. Germination changes the starches into sugars in the same way that sprouting barley to make malt changes the starch into fermentable sugars for brewing.

Although all that is interesting I have digressed a long way from germinating acorns for bonsai.

If you are worried about wasting soil and pots on acorns that may not sprout place the acorns in a plastic bag with a small amount of damp material - soil, compost, sawdust, newspaper, sand etc and close the bag. Check each week and remove any acorns that have produced a root. Plant those into pots of soil and watch them grow.
 

Leo in N E Illinois

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In my yard, squirrels will eat every acorn planted. I use bonsai wire to tie covers of hardware cloth mesh over my flats with acorns, chestnuts, and even pine seed. Critters abound and will devour everything edible. Hardware cloth is galvanized wire mesh, roughly 1/4 inch openings. Window screen, which is about 1/16 th inch is too "soft", squirrels will tear through it to get to acorns or chestnuts.

Birds like smaller seed, like pine seed. The mesh helps with them also.
 

Forsoothe!

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Squirrels can smell germinating acorns a mile away, that's how they "remember" where they buried them. I lay them on a bed of soil in a flat kept on the floor of my greenhouse, which is a cold surface. They stick a foot out and find the soil in late winter. A covering of leaves doesn't hurt.
 

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