Removing male flower buds

Nishant

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Hello All,

My Scot pine, like last year, has come up with lots of male flower buds on all the tips.

I was wondering if removing the buds is fine or will make no difference. As I am not sure, I remove only half of them ( lower half ).

My theory for removing them is that doing this will direct energy towards development of needle, foliage and roots. The tree is not in best of its health and so want to save energy where possible. These male flowers delay the formation of needles and last year the needle formation ran into August.

Please share your experience and advise.


Please advise.
 
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Japonicus

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Some pics may help
So I had a similar question with my JWP. ^ They're pollen cones. Replies were mostly no, we don't remove them
nor on any pines at least one said.
On some cultivars of JWP they are purple and I look forward to the beautiful display each year.
I am disappointed years where there are few.

Here are 2 of my JWP one this year, the other years bygone
DSC_6476.JPG

1621024809049.png
 

Potawatomi13

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These grow on new soft stems. Removing can EASILY damage these stems soon to become wood:(. After only 3-4 weeks they dry out and can be brushed off being most careful of new soft immature needles.
 

Wires_Guy_wires

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Give them a little tap with a red hot glowing nail and they'll probably stop growing and die off.
Producing pollen is not very energy consumptive, they contain nearly no proteins and sugars and they're some of the smallest cells most plants can produce. Those grains travel by wind, so they're best kept small and light.
If you go by weight, I think you could fit roughly one cone full of pollen into one bundle of needles. So energy wise, I don't think it matters a whole lot.
 

Nishant

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Give them a little tap with a red hot glowing nail and they'll probably stop growing and die off.
Producing pollen is not very energy consumptive, they contain nearly no proteins and sugars and they're some of the smallest cells most plants can produce. Those grains travel by wind, so they're best kept small and light.
If you go by weight, I think you could fit roughly one cone full of pollen into one bundle of needles. So energy wise, I don't think it matters a whole lot.
Thanks Guy_wire.

I remove the buds by popping them using my finger nails, while holding the candles to prevent from breaking.

Besides energy saving, my other important reason is that the tree waits till the flowering is complete. The needles/candles just wait for flowering cycle to finish and start off somewhere growing in end of July. By the time needles mature it is well into September, leaving little time for root formation.

Can you ( and others ) please share any experience, thoughts, suggestions about this.
 

Bnana

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Healing the wound you created likely costs more energy than making the pollen would.
The tree decided it had enough energy to make flowers, it probably knows best.
 

Brian Van Fleet

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Pollen sacks (male) form at the base of this year’s candles. The cones (seed-bearing) form at the tips of this year’s candles. I remove the cones, but don’t bother with the pollen sacks. Cones mature in 2-3 years, but the sacks will drop off in late spring.
ECD66F81-4D7A-49A4-AA9E-378843F5CAA3.jpeg
 

Japonicus

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Pollen sacks (male) form at the base of this year’s candles. The cones (seed-bearing) form at the tips of this year’s candles. I remove the cones, but don’t bother with the pollen sacks. Cones mature in 2-3 years, but the sacks will drop off in late spring.
View attachment 374734
Thanks Brian. This is my 1st Spring with that cultivar with the "cones" Azuma Goyo.
The colour has darkened to a more purple than purplish pink, as it ages.
However, the pollen cones on the other cultivar, one of the Azumas I believe,
are pretty much same colour, but not only at the tips but all along the watch tower.
I thought it was odd that the cones were only at the tips and in pairs 🤦‍♂️
 

Potawatomi13

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Thanks Brian. This is my 1st Spring with that cultivar with the "cones" Azuma Goyo.
The colour has darkened to a more purple than purplish pink, as it ages.
However, the pollen cones on the other cultivar, one of the Azumas I believe,
are pretty much same colour, but not only at the tips but all along the watch tower.
I thought it was odd that the cones were only at the tips and in pairs 🤦‍♂️
Some say this is so trees do not self pollinate with cones growing above pollen source🧐.
 

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