Repot Ginkgo ?

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This is my new quite literally stick in the mud (first) Ginkgo. It came in what looks like pure peat moss and some fertilizer.
Is it too late to repot it to a pot with some better draining soil? I looked at the roots and it's not rootbound by any means. The roots look very healthy.
 

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Cadillactaste

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It's a young tree in development...so not unheard of what it's potted in.

Bud tips peak green is when we repot gingko. Past the window of opportunity to repot.

You could get away with planting it into the ground...and not messing with the roots to grow this out more. Treated as a nursery plant with no root work...you can get away with a bit more.

My own was ground grown for a few years to put on girth by the seller I bought it from a few years back. 12" pot.

20201120_082525.jpg
 
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Hessen, Germany
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It's a young tree in development...so not unheard of what it's potted in.

Bud tips peak green is when we repot gingko. Past the window of opportunity to repot.

You could get away with planting it into the ground...and not messing with the roots to grow this out more. Treated as a nursery plant with no root work...you can get away with a bit more.

My own was ground grown for a few years to put on girth by the seller I bought it from a few years back. 12" pot.

View attachment 372677
Thanks for the answer. That's one beautiful tree! The gold accents on the pot work incredibly well.
I know it's past repotting time, I've read ginkgos can be very hardy though.
What do you think about slip potting the whole thing into a larger pot without disturbing the roots? Is it even necessary? I feel like this year's growth will be stunted by the little pot it's in, maybe that's just my inexperience talking.
 

Cadillactaste

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You are asking the wrong person. I don't slip pot. Two growing mediums which you then create in a pot...dry out differently. To me, that's risky. Maybe another may step up to answer that. I personally...would either ground grow it or leave as is for a year. Then...repot in early spring when it starts to push...and address the roots and make it a beneficial repot. *Take it with a grain of salt...that's just how I walk my journey.
 

Cadillactaste

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Sorry, my manors. I was addressing questions...and forgot to thank you for the kind words. Pot is an Erin Pottery pot. The splash of golden yellow. Victor Harris was brilliant on that hint to remind me when not fall...what this tree has hidden to share later. Fall colors.

This tree fell into my lap, while the species wasn't one I was hunting. I asked for texture of bark and fall colors. The seller showed me his best Ginkgo and it had me at first images. LOL I tend to look for characteristics and a style over species. Then...make sure it fits the bill I can care for it in my area.

Have a good day. Ginkgo in fall is a charming thing to behold. Enjoy the journey with yours.
 
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No problem! Just checked out their website, the pots are incredible. I may try to find something similar over here in Europe when the time comes.
I'm also more of a conifer person but Ginkgo leaves just can't be beat, I love the tree's uniqueness.
Hope I'll get some bushy growth to enjoy in the fall, if the grey German weather allows it.

Have a nice day too!
 

penumbra

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It's a young tree in development...so not unheard of what it's potted in.

Bud tips peak green is when we repot gingko. Past the window of opportunity to repot.

You could get away with planting it into the ground...and not messing with the roots to grow this out more. Treated as a nursery plant with no root work...you can get away with a bit more.

My own was ground grown for a few years to put on girth by the seller I bought it from a few years back. 12" pot.

View attachment 372677
Very nice. It looks like one of the leaves melted all over the pot. ;)
 
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You’re in luck then, ginkgos were previously classed as a type of deciduous conifers
Of course! As a bit of a paleontology nerd I'm almost more interested in the botanical and evolutionary aspects of the tree than anything else. I just had to have one!
 

Shibui

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I hope you are not in a hurry to see this bushy growth. Ginkgo are one of the slowest trees to develop as bonsai. I have some in the grow beds for a few years and they are thickening a little faster than any in pots but still quite slow and even slower to ramify. After pruning I often only get one new shoot rather than the 2 or 3 that most species give. 1 new replacement shoot does not do much for increasing ramification!
On the + side they don't seem to mind root pruning. Even thick roots can be chopped quite hard if necessary but I've only done that sort of work while trees are dormant.
You can slip pot but make sure outer roots are teased out to allow good contact between old soil and the new and some roots into the new soil.
 

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