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RJG2

Shohin
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I'll be adding things here that don't deserve their own threads yet (for example things I'm not sure will survive ;) ).

Let the fun begin!
 

RJG2

Shohin
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First up, a weigela! We're putting in a new paver driveway wrapping around the house into a patio, and this had to go (along with a couple other things I may attempt to salvage).

I had mentioned it in this thread; looks like I got my wish:

Had to get a little creative and combine two anderson flats, as it was bigger than I expected (remind me to cut off those screw tips...).

It's out!
PXL_20210330_161814255.jpg

Cut down:
PXL_20210331_140014384.jpg

Washing out the clay...
PXL_20210331_142140783.jpg

Cutting out the giants:
PXL_20210331_143814455.jpg

Spikey...
PXL_20210331_145821729.jpg

We're in!
PXL_20210331_152437268.jpg

PXL_20210331_150600537.jpg

PXL_20210331_152452314.jpg

Hope she lives! Might be some carving in my future.
 

Shibui

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Had to get a little creative and combine two anderson flats, as it was bigger than I expected
I keep mentioning that they are all much bigger than anticipated. Good lateral thinking with the extended tray.
Personally I would have reduced those roots a lot more than that to save on space. If you can cut the top down to stumps you can also cut the roots the same I have found.
 

RJG2

Shohin
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I keep mentioning that they are all much bigger than anticipated. Good lateral thinking with the extended tray.
Personally I would have reduced those roots a lot more than that to save on space. If you can cut the top down to stumps you can also cut the roots the same I have found.

Yeah, I've heard they produce roots pretty well too - but I'm only a couple years into this hobby and like to play it safe.

In the fall I took the reciprocating saw and cut in a circle around it when in the ground. Made it easier to remove yesterday and looks like it produced a decent amount of feeders closer in.

I would have built a box for it, but I'm finding time hard to come by lately.
 

Shibui

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In the fall I took the reciprocating saw and cut in a circle around it when in the ground. Made it easier to remove yesterday and looks like it produced a decent amount of feeders closer in.
'Root wrenching' like that can be a good technique but most people cut way too far out from the trunk to be useful.
How can you be so sure the root cutting produced more feeders closer in? Did you check before? In my experience 99% of new roots grow from the cut ends with very few growing further back on established roots. I would surmise that all those smaller roots were already there and are nothing to do with the previous root cutting but that is only conjecture based on experience because I did not check on this one before you trenched either.
 

RJG2

Shohin
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Up next is what I think is a mock orange - philadelphus coronarius. Probably don't make good bonsai considering I can't find any images, but we'll give it a try.

Took your advice on this one @Shibui as it was pretty beat up from the landscapers yanking it out anyway (and I don't care as much considering I can't find any bonsai examples).

Didn't take any great before pictures.

Wash wash wash.
PXL_20210401_154515880.MP.jpg

Tangley.
PXL_20210401_154808670.jpg

Saw saw saw.
PXL_20210401_161815710.jpg

Fits this time.
PXL_20210401_162904900.jpg

Mostly cleaned up.
PXL_20210401_170255276.jpg
PXL_20210401_170302557.jpg
 

Shibui

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Philadelphus very easy to transplant so should not even look back after that modest root prune.
The problems with this as bonsai will be:
Suckers - lots of new shoots grow from the base.
Long internodes
Soft wood prone to dieback and rotting.
Flowers on last year's shoots so mostly we cut those off when trimming so less chance of good flowering.

Fingers crossed that you can prove everyone wrong and make the world's first great Philadelphus bonsai
 

RJG2

Shohin
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Philadelphus very easy to transplant so should not even look back after that modest root prune.
The problems with this as bonsai will be:
Suckers - lots of new shoots grow from the base.
Long internodes
Soft wood prone to dieback and rotting.
Flowers on last year's shoots so mostly we cut those off when trimming so less chance of good flowering.

Fingers crossed that you can prove everyone wrong and make the world's first great Philadelphus bonsai
Thanks, I didn't see much on them when doing a quick search. It was on the side of the house hidden away so I've never really observed its growth habit. I can always throw it back in the landscape somewhere!
 

RJG2

Shohin
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Decent growth starting on the weigela. I've probably rubbed over 100 buds off, they're clustering together so much.

PXL_20210524_161623380.jpg
 

RJG2

Shohin
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In this week's episode of "RJG2's lost causes" is a P.J.M. rhododendron...

Last fall:
PXL_20201028_174135519.jpg

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PXL_20201028_182458690.jpg

A week ago:
PXL_20210701_161517390.jpg

It is pushing new growth, but slowly and not where I wanted it.

Maybe?
iMarkup_20210704_055518.jpg

Or
iMarkup_20210705_064300.jpg

Growth habit is probably too leggy, and leaves too large, but what the hell, good air layer practice. I didn't know any better at the time.
 

RJG2

Shohin
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Warning - newbie's first attempt at bonsai ahead.

When I started this hobby a couple years ago, I obviously chose a horrible starter species... A mountain ash/Sorbus americana!

I had pulled it from the forest a couple years earlier and it sat in a large planter in front of my shed - until one day I thought, I should try to make a bonsai!

Well, I tried - and made a lot of mistakes - but it's what started this journey.

* All but one branch coming from the same spot giving reverse taper ✔️
* Branch on inside of curve ✔️
* Weird root that I just shoved a rock under awkwardly ✔️

Without further ado.

Spring 2019 I think (my album/timestamps are messed up):
Image~3.jpg

Later in 2019 (that wire is doin' a whole lot):
Image~5.jpg

Spring 2020 cutback:
IMG_20200407_184139.jpg


2020 Repot, now with rock:
IMG_20200527_055127.jpg

Fall 2020:
PXL_20201021_123529447.jpg

Nowish:
PXL_20210727_130738182.jpg

Gross:
PXL_20210727_130802491.jpg

PXL_20210727_130751124.jpg

I think a re-do and chop to about here is in order:
iMarkup_20210727_212008.jpg

Somehow, I still kinda like it...
 

RJG2

Shohin
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Just some ficus microcarpa - green mound cuttings, potted in some containers I found at the local dump's "swap shop" (holes were drilled). The one with tape is a few cuttings that will hopefully fuse.

PXL_20210806_125820539.jpg
 

namnhi

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RJG2

Shohin
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I just pot up two of these as well. Did you try to remove the media they came with as they seem to soak up too much water?
I didn't, @cmeg1 said not to, I think it's still airy enough - I used to use rockwool for other things years ago, it's a good substrate.
 

cmeg1

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they seem to soak up too much water?
Or too little.
Whats going on here? Dehydration?
Or just some shipment bends from USPS in the box?Them 3” stonewool cubes will be bone dry in just over 24 hrs……water,water,water!!!!
Or will suffer root loss.
49FF97A2-EC27-4C79-AC9B-23A6FEA5A514.jpeg
 

cmeg1

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nothing at all anerobic of stonewool cubes…..are filled and sureounded with air….
These are so incredibly chock full of roots they can stay waterlogged at all times ,so you can match it to watering practices of surrounding media…….no worries whatsover.
After a two mnths it will all be trunk
 
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