Root aphids

wireme

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Thanks everyone for carrying on the conversation. I'm still researching a few things, will be shopping or calling on Monday to see what products are available. With Chickens, edibles and family cruising the yard I'm looking at toxicology effects and so on of various things.
I will be looking very closely at roots when collecting in the future, see if these come from the wild here or have come to my trees some other way.
 

sorce

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I doubt root aphids are the only small white bug you can find in the roots.

That+myc?

Have you noticed any suffering health?

I saw some ants today....

Ima go have another look.

Sorce
 

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wireme

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I doubt root aphids are the only small white bug you can find in the roots.

That+myc?
I'm confident in the diagnosis. Check this picture, identical to what I'm seeing. image.jpgThe most likely suspects seem to Pachypappa tremulae or Prociphilus xyloster.
Some copied info here:
The coniferous root aphid, Pachypappa tremulae, previously called Rhizomaria piceae, has been a pest at several British Columbia nurseries, particularly near Prince George. Infestations (Figure 90) are most common on container seedlings. Bareroot stock is rarely affected. This aphid's major hosts are container-grown spruce, potted spruce grafting stock, and sometimes pine, larch, and Douglas-fir. To date, infestations on otherwise healthy seedlings have caused no damage; this may not be true for stressed seedlings. Little is known about this aphid's life history, damage, or distribution. The aphids, which are usually most abundant on the exterior roots in the upper portion of the container cavity may go unnoticed until the seedlings are lifted. They secrete white waxy strands that might be mistaken for mycorrhizae. Part of the aphid's life cycle occurs on trembling aspen Populus tremuloides leaves, which may explain the predominance of infestations at nurseries in the north central Interior.
 

coh

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The way they congregate in patches along the outside of the root ball seems to be a common theme from what I've been reading.
 

Nybonsai12

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I have or had what i believed to be root ahpids. What I noticed was weak growth, ants, small flying/crawling aphids around the soil surface, small white patches on the soil surface, some white/yellowy patches below the soil surface and if I looked really close, almost microscopic size whitish transulcent wormlike things. I could see them wiggle if I looked closely.

I tried several malathion soaks last year. I think it significantly slowed the problem but did not eradicate it entirely although that may be my own fault. In order to eradicate them you need to do the soaks weekly to break the reproductive cycle(Thanks BVF). If I remember correctly I believe I did about three or 4 soaks over the course of 6 weeks.

So far this season I have not noticed any type of severe infestation, but i did notice what I believe is the same problem on one or two trees. As a result I have began treatment with imidicloprid by spraying the trees and soaking the roots. I am not treating azalea currently in flower.

I've done this weekly for the past 3 weeks or so to try and eradicate any insect issues. I had problem with scale on two junipers so I am trying to kill two birds with one stone. So far it appears that this course of action is working.
 

johng

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I have dealt with root aphids on Bald Cypress a few times. I have always used Ortho's Orthene Ant Killer....just sprinkle on the surface and water in...I usually repeat the treatment about a month later. This had always worked well for me...can't promise your results as I have never used on anything but BC.
 

Bonsai Nut

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Before I soaked my trees in chemical insecticide, I would consider soaking them in a pyrethrum bath (made from chrysanthemum plants). 100% organic, and devastating on aphids. Whether "aphids" includes "root aphids" or not, I don't know.
 

wireme

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Look into predatory nematodes?
That is what I did in the end actually. Them and predatory mites. I really believe it made a big difference. I did find a few when repotting this spring but not nearly as many and only in portions of mountain soil, not substrate. Also visible symptoms of the foliage, all but one tree looking much better so far this year.
 

Arcto

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Great to hear. I know R.Neil was looking into doing that. First I've heard of actual results at this time.
 

wireme

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Great to hear. I know R.Neil was looking into doing that. First I've heard of actual results at this time.
Really eh? I always figured he was a pretty smart fella:)

I have a feeling the mites are best, more mobile. But both even better. It's a specific mite, I'll get back with species.
 
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