((( Root Over Rock Maple )))

Messages
170
Likes
209
Location
Grand Rapids, Michigan
#1
This is a new tree I purchased a week or so ago. This acer has been growing over this collection rock from South Africa for over 20 yrs. I slip potted it two days ago and I plan on doing nothing to it until next years repot.:)

3917 008.JPG
The really like the rock, the more I clean it the more colors I find on it.
2017slippot.jpg
 
Messages
10,714
Likes
8,689
Location
NE Ohio: zone 5b (USA)
USDA Zone
5b
#4
You changed the pot shape...would love to see a full on view of it in new pot. What a fun tree to have on ones bench! I like the way it's done. So many ROR in some way bug me. But this one is done nicely.
 
Messages
170
Likes
209
Location
Grand Rapids, Michigan
#6
Les, is there a reason some leaves are fully out and other branches are bare?
Hi Serg, that was a concern of mine too when I got that picture. I thought it was a fall picture because he said the tree is now dormant and he in Florida but when the tree arrived it looked just like that. So I hope it will be ok a regain its vigor.
 

MACH5

Masterpiece
Messages
3,667
Likes
10,555
Location
Northern New Jersey
#7
Ok good that you only slip potted it. Definitely would not mess with the roots. I hope it does well for you. As long as the branches remain green and not grey and looking shriveled there is hope. I would keep those plants at its base in check. Personally I would clean it all out now until you know the tree is healthy. Later you can add plants if you wish.
 
Messages
170
Likes
209
Location
Grand Rapids, Michigan
#8
Ok good that you only slip potted it. Definitely would not mess with the roots. I hope it does well for you. As long as the branches remain green and not grey and looking shriveled there is hope. I would keep those plants at its base in check. Personally I would clean it all out now until you know the tree is healthy. Later you can add plants if you wish.
Ok, I'll do that today. :)
 
Messages
170
Likes
209
Location
Grand Rapids, Michigan
#9
You changed the pot shape...would love to see a full on view of it in new pot. What a fun tree to have on ones bench! I like the way it's done. So many ROR in some way bug me. But this one is done nicely.
. I
You changed the pot shape...would love to see a full on view of it in new pot. What a fun tree to have on ones bench! I like the way it's done. So many ROR in some way bug me. But this one is done nicely.
I'm normally not a fan of root over rock maples but this one caught my eye. If it recovers well this year I will look for a nice pot for it next year. I used this one because it was big enough to put the whole tree in so not to disturb the roots. :)
 
Messages
677
Likes
639
Location
Wyomissing, PA
USDA Zone
6b
#10
Hi Serg, that was a concern of mine too when I got that picture. I thought it was a fall picture because he said the tree is now dormant and he in Florida but when the tree arrived it looked just like that. So I hope it will be ok a regain its vigor.
In the many years I lived in Fl and kept potted trees and bonsai, many of the more northern temperate species I saw that somehow made their way to Florida looked similarly (there weren't many, but a high percentage of the ones I did see). I think this due to a combination of factors related to the trees being kept in a generally unsuitable unsuitable climate for longterm health and vigor(the most important of which being lack of chilling hours for proper dormancy).

From what I have read, generally speaking, trees that require winter cold can survive roughly 2 years after the last proper dormant period before finally succombing when there is a complete lack of any winter chilling hours given. If this tree was located in the Northern (or cooler parts of Central Fl) and/or was only there for a short time, the above 2 year rule of thumb may not apply.

I would say, give it excellent care relative to its species going forward and hope for the best.

I agree with Les re what a convincing root-over-rock specimen you have there.
 
Messages
170
Likes
209
Location
Grand Rapids, Michigan
#11
In the many years I lived in Fl and kept potted trees and bonsai, many of the more northern temperate species I saw that somehow made their way to Florida looked similarly (there weren't many, but a high percentage of the ones I did see). I think this due to a combination of factors related to the trees being kept in a generally unsuitable unsuitable climate for longterm health and vigor(the most important of which being lack of chilling hours for proper dormancy).

From what I have read, generally speaking, trees that require winter cold can survive roughly 2 years after the last proper dormant period before finally succombing when there is a complete lack of any winter chilling hours given. If this tree was located in the Northern (or cooler parts of Central Fl) and/or was only there for a short time, the above 2 year rule of thumb may not apply.

I would say, give it excellent care relative to its species going forward and hope for the best.

I agree with Les re what a convincing root-over-rock specimen you have there.
Thank you for that info. I'm wondering if I should keep it in the garage with the other trees or place it in our very small green house for humidity factors.
 
Messages
10,714
Likes
8,689
Location
NE Ohio: zone 5b (USA)
USDA Zone
5b
#12
Well,if it came from the south...and your a Northerner. Then the thing has not acclimated to your temps/climate. Add on a slip pot I would be protecting this if it were me. The greenhouse sounds ideal with it in leaf already.
 
Messages
170
Likes
209
Location
Grand Rapids, Michigan
#18
That's horrible... Is there any recourse from the seller?:oops:
He keep telling me to wait saying it will recover. I told him the tree was dead and the tree was out of dormancy and dying when he shipping it. He said he would not return my money and only give me half off another purchase. So I filled a complaint threw my pay pal and won the case. That was my first and probably my last time buying a tree on EBay.