Rooting Cork Bark Black Pine cuttings

Jo53ph

Yamadori
Messages
55
Reaction score
13
Location
Toledo OH
USDA Zone
6a
Hello everyone I was wondering if anyone out there could shed some light on rooting cork bark pine cuttings ? I know it can be done. I was just wondering what steps need to be taken to get them to root . Like what size is best. What kind or medium , also what’s the best rooting hormone to use. Also last but not least can you buy cork bark pine seeds and if so from where I know a lot of them are landscape trees and there is real cork barks growing wild in Japan and other countries so do these come from seed and if so where can I buy some .....
 

n8y

Mame
Messages
143
Reaction score
250
Location
North Sacramento Valley
USDA Zone
9a
Very difficult to root a cork JBP cutting, which is why you most commonly see them grafted to JBP stock. I pulled some roots on an air layer last year, but it did not survive on its own legs.
 

Jo53ph

Yamadori
Messages
55
Reaction score
13
Location
Toledo OH
USDA Zone
6a
Wow yea I know it is a very difficult process I would like to give it a try though I see Brent from evergreen gardenworks has some luck rooting a few different kinds the akame being one of them I also have one of that cultivar myself and was going to try to root some when it grows out .im sure it’s going to be a very difficult and time consuming .
 

Shibui

Masterpiece
Messages
2,458
Reaction score
4,648
Location
Yackandandah, Australia
USDA Zone
9?
Not so much difficult or time consuming, just a very, very low success rate.
I've been growing cuttings of several pines species for a few years. Best strike rate is with juvenile shoots. You can sometimes get juvenile shoots on older trees after really hard pruning. Strike rates with juvenile shoots is around 90%

Second best is 1 year old shoots. I don't have a lot of data on how time of year affects the strike. I was told late winter/early spring is the best time but I have had cuttings strike at different times here. I have never managed to get roots on a younger candle. Just hardened wood seems to be best.
I treat with a strong rooting hormone and put them in propagating mix under intermittent mist to maintain humidity. Strike rates are between 0 and 30%
I don't have any cork bark pines so can't tell you how they grow specifically. I've heard they are not as strong as the species so strike rates may be even lower?
 

bwaynef

Chumono
Messages
964
Reaction score
846
Location
Upstate SC
USDA Zone
8a
There are threads here detailing some folks adventures in rooting jbp. I don't remember that they were specifically after corkbark though. I remember high percentage hormone talc, intermittent mist (or better humidistat controlled mist), bottom heat, ...and tolerance for lower percentages than might make this commercially successful. The threads were before this new forum software, so you may have to use some search-fu to get to the posts. I've also seen articles in Japanese detailing corkbark pine cuttings. (They use a different character/word for the corkbark pine, instead of kuromatsu for jbp. I don't remember off the top of my head what it is though.). The article didn't list percentages though.
 

Leo in N E Illinois

Imperial Masterpiece
Messages
8,380
Reaction score
15,564
Location
on the IL-WI border, a mile from ''da Lake''
USDA Zone
5b
I tried, had 0% success. 'Kyokko Yatsubusa'. I used current year new growth. The cuttings died one by one. I used a Root Tone Dip and Grow hormone. I was able to keep one cutting green, alive for a full 4 years. No new growth, a little callus formed. zero roots formed even after 3 full years. Middle of 4th summer, the cutting turned brown and died. No roots, just a little callus.

Good luck.
 
Messages
248
Reaction score
363
Location
SLC You-Taw
USDA Zone
6
I have had a 100% SUCCESS rate...

...in failing at this.
 

Similar threads

Top