ROR Trident project

Brian Van Fleet

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I started a couple small ROR tridents on some nice dark stones I collected up in WA about 12 years ago. They've been sitting on my benches for years, never quite suiseki, but too nice to just toss aside (obviously, since they've moved with me half-a-dozen times). Last year I decided to strap on a couple tridents and see how they did. Here is a series of shots from last year and during this year's repotting, I was very pleased with how strongly this one grew and began to attach. The goal for this one was to attach tree at a position lower than the tallest part of the rock.

At this spring's repotting, I kept the best roots, removed some redundant ones, redirected a few that needed to be tightened down into crevices, wrapped them up again, and put them back into the pot.

Here's number 1:
 

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Brian Van Fleet

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#2

This is the second one. I wanted this one to be "perched" at the top of the rock, and show long, interesting roots snaking all the way down the taller stone. Some interesting movement was revealed at this year's repotting.

A note on ROR...they're a bear to do on your own! Last year, I did these solo, and I'm glad I could bury the stone and hide the sloppy work! But it was effective. With an extra pair of hands, this year's repotting also tightened the roots to the stone and the work is a little more aesthetically pleasing.
 

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pjkatich

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Hi Brian,

It appears that you have a good start on both of these trees. I like the looks of the second tree very much. I think this one will make a great bonsai.

And yes, an extra set of hand does make the job of wrapping the roots easier.

Regards,
Paul
 

digger714

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Nice work Brian. I did the same thing with a couple tridents this year, a few weeks ago, and did a couple serissa i had left over from last year. I started a couple more trident seedlings in a 4" piece of PVC about 18" long, to get the roots to grow straight down, and drape over the rocks next spring. Ill let ya know how that works. Do you try to get any soil or moss around the roots under the plastic wrap, or is it not a concern? Ill bet they will really be attached next year. Good job and thanks for posting it.
 

Brian Van Fleet

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Thanks, it's the first real attempt I've made at a ROR, and it seems to be working out pretty well. I didn't put any moss between the roots and the plastic because I want them to keep running tightly against the rock, and they seemed to be adhering well as it was. The plastic is actually a very stretchy film, like grafting tape, and eventually it will break down. Hopefully not too quickly, but the raffia is still there if it does. I did notice that the roots developed MUCH faster on the one packed in sphagnum moss.

My biggest concerns at this point are pushing the trunk to develop a little faster, so it will stay ahead of the roots, and then building a nice skirt of nebari at an even level around the rock. I think if I push it really hard this year, I should be able to expose about 1/2 of it next year, and in 2013, get it down to planting level where I can start to develop some of that nebari.

Good luck with yours as well.
 

Joedes3

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They both look great. I have some maple seedlings growing everywhere, I may try this.
 

fore

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Please? ;)

I can't believe how your long growing yr. produces such extensive growth in 1 yr, very impressive!
 

coh

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I'd like to know how these are doing as well...

Wanted to know if anyone has tried using expandable foam to force the roots to mold to the rock? I can't remember where I heard this idea (a lecture or symposium somewhere), and can't recall all the details - but the basic idea was to wrap the roots around the rock using plastic, then apply an expanding foam outside of that. The foam, as it expands, supposedly will force the roots into the nooks and crannies of the rock more effectively than the standard methods.

Chris
 

Brian Van Fleet

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Lots of progress...haven't decided if they need another year in the ground or not; I want to keep a good portion of the rock showing.

Here is #1 from spring root work, back in the ground, and a shot from this AM...Coincidentally, I photographed it when I was shooting that shohin trident I posted for Al's comment.
 

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Brian Van Fleet

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#2, spring root work: exposing cambium and using moss to close the gap between the bottom of the trunk and the stone, and also developing a nice radial nebari at the bottom of the stone. then, this AM:
 

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coh

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Yep, #2 looks the most "natural" to me at this point.

This is where I think I saw the idea about using foam:

http://ibonsaiclub.forumotion.com/t...watering-and-inspection-of-planting-made-easy

Bob Pressler (I think he posts here as well?) suggested using bondo to help hold the roots to the rock. I wonder if using either of these approaches would make it easier for one person to do the work...haven't tried to create any RORs yet myself.

Chris
 

fredtruck

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#2 in particular, but all of them are potentially really fine trees, Brian. Excellent work, and pretty creative, too.
 

Dan W.

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Great work Brian. :) -- Is that a snail on #3...? First picture?
 

fore

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Yep, #2 looks the most "natural" to me at this point.

This is where I think I saw the idea about using foam:

http://ibonsaiclub.forumotion.com/t...watering-and-inspection-of-planting-made-easy

Bob Pressler (I think he posts here as well?) suggested using bondo to help hold the roots to the rock. I wonder if using either of these approaches would make it easier for one person to do the work...haven't tried to create any RORs yet myself.

Chris

Chris, using expanding foam is a unique technique. I have on Trid OR going now, second yr in ground. You'd have to build some kind of box to keep the foam on the roots you want attached to the rock, and to avoid getting on developing roots on the rock. I'll have to read that thread.
 

edprocoat

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I never seen this thread before? I was wondering how the roots would adhere or hold to such a smooth rock ?

ed
 

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