Round 2 of the Ebihara Method

Bonds Guy

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Last season I took a whack at the Ebihara method and, well that tree is dead now. I figured since it’s a new season, why not try again and hopefully not kill this one.

So here’s my 2nd attempt at the Ebihara method:
Redwood - Dawnson 2.3.1.JPGRedwood - Dawnson 2.3.2.JPGRedwood - Dawnson 2.3.3.JPG
 

MrWunderful

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Ebihara Technique is more than just screwing to a board, did you select and arrange the roots as well?

in fact, I would argue that is more of the actual “technique”
 

Bonds Guy

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Do you know why your tree died?
Someone here mentioned since the trunk was pencil thin, the xylem may have gotten clogged by the screw which lead to it dropping all but one leaf. It began recover about a month later so I figured it would be best to remove the screw. A week later it started wilting and eventually died. So ironically removal of the screw killed it...... at least that's what I believe.
 

Bonds Guy

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Ebihara Technique is more than just screwing to a board, did you select and arrange the roots as well?

in fact, I would argue that is more of the actual “technique”
I removed all downward growing roots and arranged them in different directions as best as I could. I know you're suppose to use nails to keep them in place, but I couldn't find any at home and didn't want to run to the store.
 

Bonds Guy

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This will work out better if you start with a layer. Then you don't have a tap root to contend with and your roots will be on the a single plane.
I removed the tap root. That thick root with the screw in it is what's left of the tap
 
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What species is this tree?
If possible I would have pruned the roots shorter, to stimulate new roots from the trunk.
Good luck with the project!
 

Bonds Guy

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What species is this tree?
If possible I would have pruned the roots shorter, to stimulate new roots from the trunk.
Good luck with the project!
Dawn redwood. I thought pruning larger roots stimulate new root growth
 

sorce

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What species is this tree?
If possible I would have pruned the roots shorter, to stimulate new roots from the trunk.
Good luck with the project!

Cutting roots shorter won't stimulate new roots from the trunk.

........

I wholly agree this should begin with an airlayered piece.

This is not a method to start a new piece, it is a method to maintain the proper development of a piece.

Sorce
 

Adair M

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A method to start new roots off the base of the trunk is to cut little “windows” in the base of the trunk, and pack with wet spaghnum.

Another method is to carve a hole (with a drill)and find a flexible root that you can fold in half, and stick the fold into the hole. Use a bit of wood (or chopstick or toothpicks) to wedge in there to secure it. It’s a cross between an approach and thread root graft.
 
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In your second picture, the screw looks way too thick for the trunk. @0soyoung gave you a heads up to avoid this issue, here:


If a screw isn't appropriate for a specific tree, in the future you can also temporarily use wire (as well as nails and staples) to hold the tree to the board, and then wire the board into your pot. When the tree thickens, a screw can be used.

As for roots emerging from the trunk, the smartest thing anybody could do is buy material grown for bonsai, from reputable growers of pre-bonsai material. There really is no shortage of very affordable high-quality material in New York and New England.
 

Adair M

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In your second picture, the screw looks way too thick for the trunk. @0soyoung gave you a heads up to avoid this issue, here:


If a screw isn't appropriate for a specific tree, in the future you can also temporarily use wire (as well as nails and staples) to hold the tree to the board, and then wire the board into your pot. When the tree thickens, a screw can be used.

As for roots emerging from the trunk, the smartest thing anybody could do is buy material grown for bonsai, from reputable growers of pre-bonsai material. There really is no shortage of very affordable high-quality material in New York and New England.

here’s an alternative to using a screw:

74A1FEAB-F20A-4A06-90EC-B483A768B17C.jpeg
 

Bonds Guy

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In your second picture, the screw looks way too thick for the trunk.
That root is perpendicular to the trunk so it shouldn’t cause any issues

If a screw isn't appropriate for a specific tree, in the future you can also temporarily use wire (as well as nails and staples) to hold the tree to the board, and then wire the board into your pot.
Thanks for the tip. I have another redwood I could try this on
 

Mellow Mullet

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When I am using small stock, I go to the local hobby store and purchase an assortment of really small screws. You can also purchase a pinvise and small drill bits, I use this to drill a pilot hole in the trunk for the screw. This keeps the trunk from splitting, I have successfully done this on seedlings with pencil sized and a little smaller trunks
 

Bonds Guy

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When I am using small stock, I go to the local hobby store and purchase an assortment of really small screws. You can also purchase a pinvise and small drill bits, I use this to drill a pilot hole in the trunk for the screw. This keeps the trunk from splitting, I have successfully done this on seedlings with pencil sized and a little smaller trunks

Thanks for the tip. I used a 1.5mm screw on my other trident and today it’s thriving
 

crust

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A method to start new roots off the base of the trunk is to cut little “windows” in the base of the trunk, and pack with wet spaghnum.

Another method is to carve a hole (with a drill)and find a flexible root that you can fold in half, and stick the fold into the hole. Use a bit of wood (or chopstick or toothpicks) to wedge in there to secure it. It’s a cross between an approach and thread root graft.
I always referred to this as a one-point graft. I think I read this in a BT article.
 

Bonds Guy

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Hey BNuts, as the season draws to end I couldn't help but to take a "sneak peak" at nebari of this redwood. It seems that the ebihara method is working and I believe it's beginning to flair at the base a little.

IMG_1470.JPGIMG_1472.JPGIMG_1471.JPG

I have a question though. From the first batch of photos I posted, you can see the tree starts straight then it slants towards the right. My plan for this tree is to be upright and I should've wired it that way before it got so thick (Oh well I guess🤷‍♂️). Anyways is it possible that the tree will naturally straighten itself out? It seems to be doing so, but I could be seeing what I want to see.
 

defra

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Hey BNuts, as the season draws to end I couldn't help but to take a "sneak peak" at nebari of this redwood. It seems that the ebihara method is working and I believe it's beginning to flair at the base a little.

View attachment 339010View attachment 339012View attachment 339013

I have a question though. From the first batch of photos I posted, you can see the tree starts straight then it slants towards the right. My plan for this tree is to be upright and I should've wired it that way before it got so thick (Oh well I guess🤷‍♂️). Anyways is it possible that the tree will naturally straighten itself out? It seems to be doing so, but I could be seeing what I want to see.
It wont straighten itself.
You can always chop it down and regrow this is a common way to grow bonsai it wil improve the taper.
 

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