Rustic but refined Black Walnut stump/stand started

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Location
Western West Virginia
USDA Zone
6a
#1
I cut this Appalachian Black Walnut from my neighborhood 4 or 5 yrs ago. Unfortunately I lost the 3 legged stand
I had outside. It was too short to be what I really wanted anyway, and too low for a cup of coffee or box of tissues
or place to lay a remote in the living room, but perfect design for this table top. By the time I leveled the top over
the 3 legged piece/crotch with a chain saw, it would've been even shorter. So I'll start with the "stump".
All unfinished to date, but warmer weather will come and I can make more progress.






I will try a toothbrush to get at the dried mud in the bark maybe dampened bristles too
before I stain the bark. Not really sure what to do to get at the dirt yet. Don't really want to blast it
with water as it is cured and I don't want any more separation.
 
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609
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Location
Western West Virginia
USDA Zone
6a
#2

Here's the table top. Probably same tree as the stump shows 2 trunks beginning, and this table top roughly 2" thick
also looks to be twin trunks, but bigger. That's reverse of the same tree I think because it is more separated.
Anyway, I've worked the top down with 220 sand paper, and just bought 320 to rejuvenate this before I seal it.
I worked it last Summer and filled the cracks, so I could use 2 part pour epoxy. Plans change ya know...
 
Messages
609
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354
Location
Western West Virginia
USDA Zone
6a
#3
If I had a wood carving chain saw...the stump would be divided with respect to the twin trunk
down maybe 9 or 10". This would show off the bark, cambium layer and heart wood beautifully
left and right on the interior of the stump. Warmly lit from under the table top would be glorious, but I don't
have a carving chain saw, nor any experience with one.
I am reconsidering the "pour plastic" or 2 part epoxy and using 2 types of Polyurethane.

I hate using water based poly but, it prevents the cambium layer from darkening as much as the oil based poly does.

So this is of another Black Walnut tree in our area, and similar to the finished look I hope to have.
I stained the bark twice, taped off the heart wood and bark, then applied water based poly to the cambium layer, 2 coats.
10 days later after buffing that down some to blend the taped line, and prep for another type of finish, I applied
3 coats of oil based poly. The oil based poly is many times more rich and lustrous looking compared to water based.
Water based poly has an extremely short working time frame. I am slow, so appreciate the oil based always.
The bubbles off gas a lot better, and brush marks level as it dries. I don't get that with water based poly.
So you can use oil over water based after a 10 day cure between the two.
 
Last edited:
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Location
Arcadia, CA
#4
That's a real nice piece of wood. Cool project. Wood working is one of those things I'd get into time permitting and if it was available to me.
 
Messages
609
Likes
354
Location
Western West Virginia
USDA Zone
6a
#5
That's a real nice piece of wood. Cool project. Wood working is one of those things I'd get into time permitting and if it was available to me.
Thanks bleumeon. It would look perfect had the tripod crotch not rotted on me :oops:
Are these pics too big. Being on a pc big is great, but many use hand held devices.
 
Messages
609
Likes
354
Location
Western West Virginia
USDA Zone
6a
#6



already getting a taste of it.
Often during warmer temps, I'll bring one in for the evening whilst watching tv and place on the stump.
It does make a nice display but not sure the table top and the stump are meant for each other.
Any thoughts on that?
I may use the stump/block of wood, as a temp so I can repurpose the top.
 

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