Salt water for japanese black pine

Paradox

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Yes, thats right but not entirely true, some plants just tolerate the adverse conditions like poor soil while others are so adapted and specialized to those extreme condition that if you put them in regular parameters they die, Glasswort Salicornia sp for example can only grow in very salty soil, or the extremophile bacteria

While true, those few species that live at those extremes are few and the exception compared to the whole. Other examples include Spartina alterniflora, and Spartina patens, both adapted to high salt environments.

Japanese black pine is not one of those.

There are plenty of species that live along the coast that are not so tolerant of salt such as beach grass Ammophila beviligulata. Just because a species is coastal, does not mean it can tolerate salt.
 
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AJL

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While true, those few species that live at those extremes are few and the exception compared to the whole. Other examples include Spartina alterniflora, and Spartina patens, both adapted to high salt environments.

Japanese black pine is not one of those.

There are plenty of species that live along the coast that are not so tolerant of salt such as beach grass Ammophila beviligulata. Just because a species is coastal, does not mean it can tolerate salt.
Also Tamarix spp- planted on the edge of beaches all around the Greek islands and in resorts around the Mediterranean - it actually seems to excrete salt solution in droplets from its leaves in the early mornings :- Whats going on there?
 

AJL

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Then there are salt tolerant Tomatoes bred by the Israelis to grow in saline Irrigation water pumped from below the Sinai and Negev deserts.....
 

Paradox

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Also Tamarix spp- planted on the edge of beaches all around the Greek islands and in resorts around the Mediterranean - it actually seems to excrete salt solution in droplets from its leaves in the early mornings :- Whats going on there?

Salt marsh grass (Spartina spp) do the same. They have a mechanism to actively exude salt from their tissues. Pretty cool how a few species have adapted to inhabit extreme environments where others would not survive.
 

Matte91

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Cork JBP are a difficult tree to keep healthy in Europe. Many people has problems just keeping them a live.
 

Scorpius

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Heat and humidity for a long time seems to be the ticket in my area. Its been awful hot this summer and my corkers love it.
 

BonjourBonsai

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Pretty cool how a few species have adapted to inhabit extreme environments where others would not survive.
And some species have created extreme environments. Can we adapt to them is the big question we are all facing now. I'm hopeful.
 

rockm

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Also Tamarix spp- planted on the edge of beaches all around the Greek islands and in resorts around the Mediterranean - it actually seems to excrete salt solution in droplets from its leaves in the early mornings :- Whats going on there?
It's nickname in the desert southwest of the U.S. is "Salt Cedar" It's is highly tolerant of alkaline soils. It concentrates salt in its tissues and can excrete them through its leaves. It is not a conifer. It was introduced into the SW U.S. to control erosion and could take iffy soils there. It's now an invasive.
 

Bonsai Nut

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We're talking about osmosis here - the intercellular transport of water - and changes to osmotic pressure due to adding salt.

In a nutshell, if you add salt to water you increase the osmotic pressure of that water, and, since water passes from regions of lower osmotic pressure to regions of higher osmotic pressure, you will draw water out of bordering plant cells. This is why trees that die from exposure to salt (like after storm surge with a hurricane) appear dried and burned - even when the tree roots are submerged in water. Watering most plants with salt water is worse than not watering them at all. It actively "dries" the plant by "pulling" water out of the roots.

Some plants have adapted specific mechanisms to be able to live in proximity to salt water. Japanese black pine is not one of them. It is tolerant of salt spray... but cannot live when the roots are soaked in salt water.
 
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waydeo

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I grew some mangroves as a filter for a mini reef tank in the eighties. I had to wipe salt off the leaves to keep it looking good. Interesting to watch shrimp, and crabs forage in the roots. I might have to do one again. You guys give me more ideas than I have time and money for. Lol
 
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