Scots Pine special case fun project ( landscape nursery reject)

River's Edge

Masterpiece
Messages
3,391
Reaction score
8,352
Location
Vancouver Island, British Columbia
USDA Zone
8b
This Scots pine shows some interest in the lower trunk and nebari. Will require lots of interior growth development and will be a challenge to place primary branches! Makes me think of a certain B-Nut and his approach. I think I will call the tree "Murphy" With a special name it deserves a unique design so I am open to suggestions;)
The black dot marks the 32 inch level for height. Is there a style called triple drop branch?
"All I know is that there had better be a dropped branch on this tree when the initial styling is done!!!"
Not expecting a show winner here @Dav4 but do you have any ideas:cool:


IMG_1362.JPG
 

Dav4

Drop Branch Murphy
Messages
11,471
Reaction score
22,691
Location
North Georgia/lived in MA until 2009
USDA Zone
7b
Wow, I’m honored! That’s a tall tree! It definitely needs a lot of interior growth development but I think there is a fair amount of potential with the bones currently there. I am wondering if you could turn that lowest left branch into a secondary trunk as there doesn’t appear to be a lot of branching down on the lower left part of the tree. This would be a tree I would stare at it for a long time before committing…. Wish I were of more help🙂
 

River's Edge

Masterpiece
Messages
3,391
Reaction score
8,352
Location
Vancouver Island, British Columbia
USDA Zone
8b
I am wondering if you could turn that lowest left branch into a secondary trunk
solid suggestion!
This would be a tree I would stare at it for a long time before committing
That makes two of us!
I have not really decided what might be possible!
Except something vis intriguing about the possibilities and it is a Pine! Slight bias on my part.
 

ShadyStump

Chumono
Messages
772
Reaction score
1,104
Location
Southern Colorado, USA
USDA Zone
6a
How do scots pines bud back? I'm unfamiliar there, but it will make all the difference. And how long a project are you interested in?
Whatever the case, the lines are exquisite!
Got pics of a few more angles?
 

River's Edge

Masterpiece
Messages
3,391
Reaction score
8,352
Location
Vancouver Island, British Columbia
USDA Zone
8b
How do scots pines bud back? I'm unfamiliar there, but it will make all the difference. And how long a project are you interested in?
Whatever the case, the lines are exquisite!
Got pics of a few more angles?
This is my only Scots Pine, bought it on a whim because it intrigued me. Willing to experiment with the species, not concerned about the timeline as I have hundreds of trees to work with and can afford to be patient. I believe they back bud pretty well and I am confident in my grafting skills so that opens other possibilities as well. I will get some other angle shots in a couple of weeks after I finish coiling wire and get my hydraulic cart back in use for the normal purposes. In the meantime here is the opposite side! Took this one before I repotted in the Anderson Flat this spring.IMG_1353.JPG
 

Stella

Sapling
Messages
32
Reaction score
34
Location
Pretoria, South Africa
I would cut at the blue line (maybe a bit higher up) and make some nice deadwood. then change the planting angle and develop the red line. you have lots of branching their and thin enough to get nice back budding. the tine back branch could also aid in creating some interesting deadwood. Otherwise also remove.
 

Attachments

  • bnut1.jpg
    bnut1.jpg
    325.1 KB · Views: 15

River's Edge

Masterpiece
Messages
3,391
Reaction score
8,352
Location
Vancouver Island, British Columbia
USDA Zone
8b
Cut above 3rd branch. Develop from there.
That is the first thing that I think of each time I consider the overall. Then I consider where to graft to put the branch thickness into proportion for a 24 inch tree which would be the result! That move definitely takes advantage of movement and taper already present.
The difficulty I have with that move is the second branch originates from an inside curve which would leave the lower branch and new apical trunk line as the only two remaining branches.
 

River's Edge

Masterpiece
Messages
3,391
Reaction score
8,352
Location
Vancouver Island, British Columbia
USDA Zone
8b
I would cut at the blue line (maybe a bit higher up) and make some nice deadwood. then change the planting angle and develop the red line. you have lots of branching their and thin enough to get nice back budding. the tine back branch could also aid in creating some interesting deadwood. Otherwise also remove.
I can see that as a possibility and doable. I have not worked with a lot of deadwood creation as a part of pine design in the past. tend to shy away from that aspect. Not sure I could make that a believable design. I think I would first want to determine how much the lower branch could be re positioned in an upright form.
 

River's Edge

Masterpiece
Messages
3,391
Reaction score
8,352
Location
Vancouver Island, British Columbia
USDA Zone
8b
So to combine a few suggestions, what if? Move lower branch up as Dav4 suggested. Remove thick branch as red line suggests. Graft or develop small shoot as new apical leader in the area noted! There are a few small shoots on the trunk at that level. Also a strong cut back for remaining branches and removal of top this fall should trigger considerable bud back next spring throughout the tree. It was repotted this spring to the Anderson Flat and will receive heavily fertilization throughout this growing season. So far the tree has not skipped a beat after the repot.


IMG_1362 2.JPG
 

Hartinez

Masterpiece
Messages
2,369
Reaction score
5,972
Location
Albuquerque, NM
USDA Zone
7
Have you considered this tree for a raft Frank? it just seems so far off from a specific style that it may be fan opportunity to try something completely different. Just a thought.
i took the pic. rotated it and overlaid a quick sketch of what i envisioned Showing that you’ve got the trunks already present and would just need some back budding for branching. If they back bud anything like mugo pine youll have great success, especially with your horticultural skills!
E7E2DAC9-026F-4C2A-A66B-86FCB3431BBE.jpeg
C6894259-61CE-4CE3-9C96-4C2FCF37A742.jpeg
 

River's Edge

Masterpiece
Messages
3,391
Reaction score
8,352
Location
Vancouver Island, British Columbia
USDA Zone
8b
Have you considered this tree for a raft Frank? it just seems so far off from a specific style that it may be fan opportunity to try something completely different. Just a thought.
i took the pic. rotated it and overlaid a quick sketch of what i envisioned Showing that you’ve got the trunks already present and would just need some back budding for branching. If they back bud anything like mugo pine youll have great success, especially with your horticultural skills!
View attachment 376900
View attachment 376901
I can see that approach creating a rather large forrest on a slab. Nicely thought out. And it does suit the branch angles that appear more deciduous than conifer at this point. Not a preferred option for me however, I have never been a fan of forest plantings even when really well done. My reconstructed back would definitely object;)
 

Hartinez

Masterpiece
Messages
2,369
Reaction score
5,972
Location
Albuquerque, NM
USDA Zone
7
I can see that approach creating a rather large forrest on a slab. Nicely thought out. And it does suit the branch angles that appear more deciduous than conifer at this point. Not a preferred option for me however, I have never been a fan of forest plantings even when really well done. My reconstructed back would definitely object;)
Haha. Totally get it. I just thought I’d present a wholly different option considering the raw material. That would be one hell of a huge pot! Obscure bonsai styles are not necessarily my cup of tea either as it seems so difficult to make them convincing.
 

River's Edge

Masterpiece
Messages
3,391
Reaction score
8,352
Location
Vancouver Island, British Columbia
USDA Zone
8b
Haha. Totally get it. I just thought I’d present a wholly different option considering the raw material. That would be one hell of a huge pot! Obscure bonsai styles are not necessarily my cup of tea either as it seems so difficult to make them convincing.
One of my bias's is the thought that they typically are used to make something out of lesser material and the focus becomes the overall rather than the detail components that contribute to the overall. Bonsai for me has to include the time and care taken to develop the detail within the design, in spite of characteristics that might flaunt convention or popular opinion of the times. The art should supersede the rule at times:eek:
The pictures do not do this tree justice the trunk movement is amazing with natural slender taper incorporated. The distracting aspect is the angle of branching lending itself to more of a deciduous style, at least in my opinion. This is a natural tendency for young Scots Pine, and that coupled with sparse foliage makes visualizing a compact pine style difficult in the beginning. The prevalent flaky red bark denotes a relatively young tree. Will be interesting to see what it can look like in five or ten years. This year is to establish vigour and recover from extensive root work done early this spring.
 

Similar threads

Top Bottom