Second Flush on Texas Cedar Elm

eeeealmo

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Hey Everyone - I have a very healthy tx cedar elm that I recently cut back to induce a second flush. The second flush grew as expected, but I'm curious about something. The first 1-3 "nodes" on the second flush don't appear to have leaves - only sheathes?

Are there dormant buds here?
If I cut back to these, will it just die back?
How do I prevent this in the future if it's not going to help improve ramification.

Thanks!

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sorce

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I reckon if you wait long enough you'll see buds there.

Sorce
 

Underdog

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I have a couple already trimmed twice in Ohio. I cut to the second or even first real leaf. Index or middle finger in first pic. They will push buds on a 10yr old trunk.
 

PA_Penjing

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I don't have an answer to your question unfortunately. I have noticed that elm seems to be lacking "experts" or specific resources. There are many pine, juniper and maple experts and books for each genus but I guess elm is so straight forward no one has bothered? maybe? I keep seeing elm questions go unanswered or just guess at, it's interesting. Hoping this bump helps get an answer.
 

eeeealmo

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I don't have an answer to your question unfortunately. I have noticed that elm seems to be lacking "experts" or specific resources. There are many pine, juniper and maple experts and books for each genus but I guess elm is so straight forward no one has bothered? maybe? I keep seeing elm questions go unanswered or just guess at, it's interesting. Hoping this bump helps get an answer.
Well i will do some tests and see what happens, then report back!
 

Hartinez

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Let that growth lignify first. Buds will form and when you cut you’ll get new growth from every bud below the cut site. The buds will appear once the growth begins to harden off.
 

Hartinez

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Let that growth lignify first. Buds will form and when you cut you’ll get new growth from every bud below the cut site. The buds will appear once the growth begins to harden off.
At least, this is my experience on all of the elms I’ve worked with. Siberian, and a few varieties of Chinese.

go through this thread by @VAFisher it may help you out.

 

BobbyLane

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BobbyLane

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I don't have an answer to your question unfortunately. I have noticed that elm seems to be lacking "experts" or specific resources. There are many pine, juniper and maple experts and books for each genus but I guess elm is so straight forward no one has bothered? maybe? I keep seeing elm questions go unanswered or just guess at, it's interesting. Hoping this bump helps get an answer.

theres an extensive section on elms in Colin lewis's book at the beginning https://www.amazon.co.uk/ART-BONSAI-DESIGN-Colin-Lewis/dp/1402700709

Elms are an easy and simple species to develop into bonsai they grow fast, fully hardy, show insults the middle finger and back bud on old wood. google searches will throw up lots of information.
 

TN_Jim

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Hey Everyone - I have a very healthy tx cedar elm that I recently cut back to induce a second flush. The second flush grew as expected, but I'm curious about something. The first 1-3 "nodes" on the second flush don't appear to have leaves - only sheathes?

Are there dormant buds here?
If I cut back to these, will it just die back?
How do I prevent this in the future if it's not going to help improve ramification.

Thanks!

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There is a wealth of information in links here that are relevant to information I seek beyond the questions of the op, thanks much to you folks.


Thoughts on the questions asked...

yes those are healthy buds. what you are calling sheaths are stipules that appear healthy indicating good buds. these stipules will die and fall following when the leaf emerges.

if I were trying to create ramification in a branch, reduce leaf size, shorten internodes, or activate those buds I would cut each branch to two leaves if the tree is healthy. Cutting to two leaves will definitely let some light in as well aiding all those things. I would not cut beyond two leaves to the buds -could, but why risk it..

am curious what the whole tree looks like.

You can’t prevent this healthy growth in the future, only hone it back to encourage what you want. You could slow it down, but why slow if developing branches and/or not looking for tighter internodes? Also agree that if just left to extend and fatten those buds would activate without any trimming, especially if they have light getting to them.
 

BobbyLane

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Theres a vid about pruning elms, well deciduous trees in general by Graham potter on youtube, ive shared many time on the forum.
 

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