Seedling cuttings technique question

Lorax7

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A while ago, I watched a YouTube video of Jonas Dupuich doing a seedling cutting technique on very young pines. My understanding is that this jumpstarts development of nice radial nebari. However, I’ve only seen mentions of people doing this technique with pines. Considering that development of good nebari is a goal that is applicable to many bonsai, I’m wondering if anyone has tried applying this technique to other genera besides Pinus.

I have a bunch of seed on order from Sheffield’s this year and I was thinking of trying out this technique both on the pines I ordered and on other genera. However, if someone has already tried and found that it is not applicable to certain groups of trees, that would be useful information to know so I don’t waste my time on a project doomed to failure. For example, I have some common juniper seeds and high-elevation-harvested redwood seeds that I thought I’d try the technique on once the seedlings get going.
 

penumbra

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A while ago, I watched a YouTube video of Jonas Dupuich doing a seedling cutting technique on very young pines. My understanding is that this jumpstarts development of nice radial nebari. However, I’ve only seen mentions of people doing this technique with pines. Considering that development of good nebari is a goal that is applicable to many bonsai, I’m wondering if anyone has tried applying this technique to other genera besides Pinus.

I have a bunch of seed on order from Sheffield’s this year and I was thinking of trying out this technique both on the pines I ordered and on other genera. However, if someone has already tried and found that it is not applicable to certain groups of trees, that would be useful information to know so I don’t waste my time on a project doomed to failure. For example, I have some common juniper seeds and high-elevation-harvested redwood seeds that I thought I’d try the technique on once the seedlings get going.
cmeg is the guy you want to talk to. He is doing a bang up job with zelkova and I bought some of the healthiest JBP from him that are as good as it gets.
 

Dav4

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I did it with trident seedlings... the results were moderately underwhelming, meaning that most of the seedling cuttings grew roots but the nebari wasn't so great that it was worth slowing the first year development of the seedling when compared to seedlings that weren't cut.
 

Shibui

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I did it with trident seedlings... the results were moderately underwhelming, meaning that most of the seedling cuttings grew roots but the nebari wasn't so great that it was worth slowing the first year development of the seedling when compared to seedlings that weren't cut.
I found the same with pine seedling cuttings. A percentage had real great radial roots but others only moderate and a few just produced 1 new root. I get much better results simply by pruning the tap root appropriately to promote improved laterals.
I also found it does not appear to matter where the seedling stem is chopped to make the cuttings. I can cut from just above the existing roots to anywhere in the juvenile leaves and still get rooting.
I have chopped oak seedling roots completely off soon after germination and planted the top as a similar cutting. Those produce better lateral roots than when they are left to develop a long tap root.
I've never bothered to try it with maples but I certainly do chop the initial developing roots when pricking out the seedlings. Early initial root pruning does seem to give much improved lateral root development so I would not be surprised to see it work on most species.
 

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