semi-cascade manzanita

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I collected this tree last winter from a pull-out alongside a road that goes to a popular summer get-away. It was the tree everyone backed over and it literally gave the tree its initial styling. I recently styled this tree as this time of year is good for wiring them--all the new growth has hardened off and is starting to lignify. I'll try to post the photos in the order of the styling progression...here goes:eek:
 

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Bonsai Nut

Nuttier than your average Nut
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It looks much happier in the 3rd photo :) I'll be interested to see this tree over time especially given the wounded trunk. Perhaps it is my imagination (or the photo angle) but there appears to be much more character in the trunkline in the 3rd photo versus the 1st. Perhaps this is due to new growth around the undamaged sections of trunk?
 

Smoke

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Interesting tree. I like the trunk, looks sort of twisted.

Would this be considered slant rather than semi-cascade since the tree does not fall below the edge of the pot?

Al
 

imholte

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Maybe Greg has plans for a cascading branch? I just love the character of the wood on these, reminds me of live veins on junipers.
 
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It looks much happier in the 3rd photo :) I'll be interested to see this tree over time especially given the wounded trunk. Perhaps it is my imagination (or the photo angle) but there appears to be much more character in the trunkline in the 3rd photo versus the 1st. Perhaps this is due to new growth around the undamaged sections of trunk?
You picked up on something I hadn't paid any attention to. The first photo taken before styling was shot a few degrees counterclockwise from where the finished image was taken. Check out the pattern on the side of the pot;)
 
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Interesting tree. I like the trunk, looks sort of twisted.

Would this be considered slant rather than semi-cascade since the tree does not fall below the edge of the pot?

Al
Al--you're right about the style; guess there could be the possibility for a semi-cascade style in the near future, especially if this tree keeps growing like it did its first season.
 
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Maybe Greg has plans for a cascading branch? I just love the character of the wood on these, reminds me of live veins on junipers.
Peter Bloomer has a good term for the mix of live wood and deadwood on manzanitas: redwood/deadwood. His wife Mary has been growing them with some success for years now.
 
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Nice. The fact your manzanita has survived planting is, in itself, noteworthy!
Thank you, Barry:D I'm finding the key to successfully keeping manzanita happy in a bonsai pot is giving the roots plenty of room as indeeper pot. They also don't like to have thicker woody roots removed or cut back. The tree in this post has woody roots at the bottom of the pot; I tried to preserve as many roots when I dug as I possibly could. I think I'll let this go one more season before I re-pot it as I initially potted it in pumice, akadama and lave in equal proportions. It's also important to feed them well through the growing season, which for here was kind of late this year. It didn't open buds until June, but grew strongly through the summer. I fertilized it with organic cake type fertilizer.
 
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Vance Wood

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I still have questions about this tree. It has now been established that you can collect successfully the young and small "Nitas", but has anyone had success with the large and old examples that look like they jumped out of a Kimura project. I used to see a lot of them when I was living in California but so far I have not seen an example of one posted anywhere.
 
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I still have questions about this tree. It has now been established that you can collect successfully the young and small "Nitas", but has anyone had success with the large and old examples that look like they jumped out of a Kimura project. I used to see a lot of them when I was living in California but so far I have not seen an example of one posted anywhere.
Why don't you give it a rest, Vance? We've been through this on a number of forums; it's ridiculous. First on Garden Web, then IBC and this one a couple years ago. I'm through posting to refresh your memory every couple of years. The only point I see to your post here is to belittle the tree being presented.

I might say that I've seen your nursery mugos and they leave me wanting when compared to some of the awesome yamadori mugos we see in a lot of European shows. And the yamadori pines that are available in the U.S. make yours look "young and small". How does it feel, back at ya?
 

Vance Wood

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I keep asking the question hoping that someone has cracked that nut, so why don't you cut me some slack I meant no offence?

I did not say anything bad about this tree, your trees, any-one's trees. You assume to think what my intentions are but you are wrong. I seldom say anything about any-one's trees so what makes you think I,--- by posing the question about the really old Manaznittas, am only using this as a ploy to criticize what you are doing? Do you think I spend my days and nights thinking of ways to belittle your accomplishments with this tree? If you go back to the GW days, which you brought up, if I remember correctly; it was my questions about collecting Manzanittas that forced you to post some pictures of your efforts. Further still it was this that got you selected to do some shows and conventions with Manzanittas as a focal point.

And even now, after having my work slammed by you, refuse to follow suit. However seeing that legitimate criticism seems to be the message of the day my I respectfully offer this: For a man who has spear-headed Manzanittas from collected material why have you not gone after this problem (collecting the really old and twisted ones) with the same zeal you exercise to go after me?

Believe me, if I had access to the same type and age Mugos that are available to European masters do you think I would not go after them? This begs the question, if you have access to the young stuff and demonstrated the ability to harvest it from the wild, why have you not gone after the really old and valuable stuff that has to be out there? This would drive me crazy.

I'm sorry Greg, but you threw down this gauntlet, I just asked a question and was attacked for it. I will continue to ask this question from time to time hoping to get a difinitive answer and not just venom. I will make a note not to ask it of you. For those reading this and wondering what is going on I will ask the original question.

For those who live in California and parts of the South West there is a native bush called Manzanitta. They are a gorgeous little tree that rivals, and I would say surpasses the Florida Buttonwood in beauty because of the delicate little flowers and the stricking red bark. I saw many of these trees growing up in California, many of them were old and beaten up by the weather and environment. Many of them had the kinds of trunks you would expect to see comming out of a Kimura studio; gnarled, weathered, bleached white by the sun and reachable. My question was then as it is now has anyone as yet found a way to collect these trees? Greg has proven he can collect the young ones. That's wonderful and an accomplishment, but what about the really old ones? Is it wrong to ask such a question?
 
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irene_b

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Here in Texas we have them but since they are on the list of endangered we can't collect them. But saying this I did collect a grouping/cluster of them that was growing in a area loaded with Texas Mountain Laurels (several ID'd the plant in question and all agreed they thought it was Texas Mountain Laurel and acceptable to collect) and they were growing in a caprock area and had to only be scooped up and planted into a Bonsai Pot. I will try to remember to take pics of it. And since it is a Manza it will be donated to The Texas State Bonsai Exhibit and Leaning Center when it opens.
Irene
 

Vance Wood

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Here in Texas we have them but since they are on the list of endangered we can't collect them. But saying this I did collect a grouping/cluster of them that was growing in a area loaded with Texas Mountain Laurels (several ID'd the plant in question and all agreed they thought it was Texas Mountain Laurel and acceptable to collect) and they were growing in a caprock area and had to only be scooped up and planted into a Bonsai Pot. I will try to remember to take pics of it. And since it is a Manza it will be donated to The Texas State Bonsai Exhibit and Leaning Center when it opens.
Irene
That could be the issue in California as well, -?-? I'm afraid to ask.
 

irene_b

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That could be the issue in California as well, -?-? I'm afraid to ask.
LOL Ask anyways!
Sometimes in order for change to happen you have to be the one to change/or change the way you look at things...I prefer to look at things in a positive learning and ignore all the rest;0...
To little time to let the shyt get to me anymore...
Irene
 

Vance Wood

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LOL Ask anyways!
Sometimes in order for change to happen you have to be the one to change/or change the way you look at things...I prefer to look at things in a positive learning and ignore all the rest;0...
To little time to let the shyt get to me anymore...
Irene
That may be true, in fact it is true about the learning curve. However when the shyt gets flung in your face-----------that's a different matter, especially when it was uncalled for. I think?
 
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I keep asking the question hoping that someone has cracked that nut, so why don't you cut me some slack I meant no offence?

I did not say anything bad about this tree, your trees, any-one's trees. You assume to think what my intentions are but you are wrong. I seldom say anything about any-one's trees so what makes you think I,--- by posing the question about the really old Manaznittas, am only using this as a ploy to criticize what you are doing? Do you think I spend my days and nights thinking of ways to belittle your accomplishments with this tree? If you go back to the GW days, which you brought up, if I remember correctly; it was my questions about collecting Manzanittas that forced you to post some pictures of your efforts. Further still it was this that got you selected to do some shows and conventions with Manzanittas as a focal point.

And even now, after having my work slammed by you, refuse to follow suit. However seeing that legitimate criticism seems to be the message of the day my I respectfully offer this: For a man who has spear-headed Manzanittas from collected material why have you not gone after this problem (collecting the really old and twisted ones) with the same zeal you exercise to go after me?

Believe me, if I had access to the same type and age Mugos that are available to European masters do you think I would not go after them? This begs the question, if you have access to the young stuff and demonstrated the ability to harvest it from the wild, why have you not gone after the really old and valuable stuff that has to be out there? This would drive me crazy.

I'm sorry Greg, but you threw down this gauntlet, I just asked a question and was attacked for it. I will continue to ask this question from time to time hoping to get a difinitive answer and not just venom. I will make a note not to ask it of you. For those reading this and wondering what is going on I will ask the original question.

For those who live in California and parts of the South West there is a native bush called Manzanitta. They are a gorgeous little tree that rivals, and I would say surpasses the Florida Buttonwood in beauty because of the delicate little flowers and the stricking red bark. I saw many of these trees growing up in California, many of them were old and beaten up by the weather and environment. Many of them had the kinds of trunks you would expect to see comming out of a Kimura studio; gnarled, weathered, bleached white by the sun and reachable. My question was then as it is now has anyone as yet found a way to collect these trees? Greg has proven he can collect the young ones. That's wonderful and an accomplishment, but what about the really old ones? Is it wrong to ask such a question?
Vance--I'd like to set the record straight about being invited to give a workshop at the GSBF convention in Anaheim CA; that invite came from the workshop chair, Paul De Rose. He read the interview of me that Tom Kelly did for GSBF "Golden Statements" in the Sept/Oct 2004 issue. You had absolutely nothing to do with it. And as for goading me to post a photo to prove what I was talking about, that may well be true. But I had every intention of upgrading my system to post photos of my bonsai before I ever heard of you. So don't try to take credit for something you had nothing to do with. And now, I'm going to post some photos of the manzanitas I've collected, kept and sold over the years.
 

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I thought I'd post a photo of one of the local species of manzanita I'm working on. Latin name is Arctostaphylos columbiana; this specimen was collected in Washington but occurs across the Columbia river in Oregon too. Vance Wood was incorrect in saying manzanitas occur only in CA and parts of the southwest. In truth, they occur on the west coast of North America from Canada to Mexico and on down into South America. I met a woman from Argentina who commented that they have them there too when she saw my trees.

I collected this tree Feb 1st 2007. It was growing between 2 deep ATV ruts and was clinging for dear life to a rock there. I was able to pry the rock loose to expose the entire root system and collect it without much disturbance. I potted it in 100% pumice 3/16" particle size. It budded profusely in June and did so well I decided to put it in the pot you see it's in in the photo. The plastic pot it was originally in was packed with white feeder roots. A very good sign. The pot it's in now might seem a bit deep but I've found this to be key to their long-term survival in a bonsai pot. I've also learned to leave the larger woody roots alone. They store a lot of important things in them and I've learned you can't cut them back like you can other species.

It may be ready for some styling next fall as I plan to be moving this spring. I hope my posting will be an inspiration to those willing to try working with this beautiful species. The tree is over 3' wide, trunk is a little over 2" in diam. over 1' in height
 

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irene_b

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Greg, Thank You for your insight into the manza.
And all the great pics!
Irene
 
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