Shimpaku Foliage Yellowing URGENT

JoeR

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I posted in "My Questions Thread" and haven't been getting any responses so I made a thread.

It has become worse since I first noticed it. My new shimpaku from Brent is yellowing In random areas not from the tips and not from the interior, but the center progressing to the tips (mostly).

It is in direct Sun with afternoon shade; however, it has mostly been cloudy and rainy for the past week or two.

Repotted it maybe a week or So, only removing roots damaged from raking. It was more roots than soil and I ended up replacing most the soil. Used the only soil I have, perlite and potting soil mixed. It does NOT dry out like I need it to but I can't do anything untill I buy some soil components.

I think it's fungal/water issues. If The tips were Brown I'd think it was Sun, and if it was the interior I'd think it was just natural processes. I may have removed too much beneficial fungus' that I read was necessary?

Please help, my first two junipers died.... I'd really like to be able to keep ONE alive.

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Thanks, Joe.
 

Lynn E

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Joe--I did an emergency re-pot on an old shimp cascade because it was in badly compacted, poorly-draining soil. Lost more than 50% of its roots due to root rot. The tree promptly lost 85% of its foliage. Don't despair yet--my tree is fat and happy now. Has re-grown almost all of the lost foliage. Lynn
 

JoeR

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Joe--I did an emergency re-pot on an old shimp cascade because it was in badly compacted, poorly-draining soil. Lost more than 50% of its roots due to root rot. The tree promptly lost 85% of its foliage. Don't despair yet--my tree is fat and happy now. Has re-grown almost all of the lost foliage. Lynn
So just wait it out?

I'm not fertilizing currently, don't know If I should.
 

erb.75

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to check the water level, you could stick a bamboo skewer in the dirt. when you pull up on the skewer it will tell you how much moisture is left in the pot.

any chance of bugs causing this? you seem to think it's a watering issue. If you're worried about the soil staying wet, don't water it right now. If the tree is getting root rot from too much water, just leave it alone for now.

If the soil has too much organic, it's easy to "overwater" the tree because the soil stays too moist. I'd leave it alone, see if it gets better. I don't have much experience with shimpaku's, so I don't know if an emergency repot is required here or not. Best think to do is to stay calm! Sunlight can pull trees through stressful periods
 

erb.75

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plus, lots of your tips look green still...that's a really good sign
 

JoeR

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to check the water level, you could stick a bamboo skewer in the dirt. when you pull up on the skewer it will tell you how much moisture is left in the pot.

any chance of bugs causing this? you seem to think it's a watering issue. If you're worried about the soil staying wet, don't water it right now. If the tree is getting root rot from too much water, just leave it alone for now.

If the soil has too much organic, it's easy to "overwater" the tree because the soil stays too moist. I'd leave it alone, see if it gets better. I don't have much experience with shimpaku's, so I don't know if an emergency repot is required here or not. Best think to do is to stay calm! Sunlight can pull trees through stressful periods
Yes I do use the skewer method. Its not me that's watering it, it has rained every other day or more and so they're pretty soaked, nothing I can do but maybe shelter them next time.

The soil is mostly organic but I'm going to switch it very soon.
 

Brian Van Fleet

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Treat it with a fungicide.
Keep it in full sun all day.
Learn how to water; you either allowed it to dry out, or you're overwatering.
Brown parts are dead, and will not become green again.
Green tips are a good sign, watch those as your indicator of recovery.
If it came from Brent, it's in perlite and bark. Good soil, but you'll need to watch it and learn when it needs water.
Don't repot.
Feed as normal.
Don't panic, don't dote over it, don't expect it to die or thrive overnight. You'll know in 4-6 weeks.
 

JoeR

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Treat it with a fungicide.
Keep it in full sun all day.
Learn how to water; you either allowed it to dry out, or you're overwatering.
Brown parts are dead, and will not become green again.
Green tips are a good sign, watch those as your indicator of recovery.
If it came from Brent, it's in perlite and bark. Good soil, but you'll need to watch it and learn when it needs water.
Don't repot.
Feed as normal.
Don't panic, don't dote over it, don't expect it to die or thrive overnight. You'll know in 4-6 weeks.
Thanks for the reply as always.

Hate to say it, but I haven't the slightest idea how to choose a fungicide. I don't know what I'm looking for, what brand, what price, anything.

Any guidance for one on this specific problem and one for preventative measures on say crabapple, cherry, plum?
 

sorce

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Repotted it maybe a week or So, only removing roots damaged from raking. It was more roots than soil and I ended up replacing most the soil. Used the only soil I have, perlite and potting soil mixed. It does NOT dry out like I need it to but I can't do anything untill I buy some soil components


I kill junipers like bad news kills a buzz, like all their names are Kenny, like blue kills innocents.

But the statement above says you can't do anything until you get soil components, but also that you have DONE THE ONLY THING YOU NEED SOIL COMPONENTS FOR!

Now the deed is done, you really oughtn't repot again!
That the case, I'd put something over the pot that allows air flow, but will block the rain.

You have to gain control of the wet.

Or we can write a book, 300 ways to a "baconized" juniper!
Vance gets title credits!

Sorce
 

JoeR

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I kill junipers like bad news kills a buzz, like all their names are Kenny, like blue kills innocents.

But the statement above says you can't do anything until you get soil components, but also that you have DONE THE ONLY THING YOU NEED SOIL COMPONENTS FOR!

Now the deed is done, you really oughtn't repot again!
That the case, I'd put something over the pot that allows air flow, but will block the rain.

You have to gain control of the wet.

Or we can write a book, 300 ways to a "baconized" juniper!
Vance gets title credits!

Sorce
What's wrong with slip potting it after I get new soil?

I just built a bench out of some scrap renovation materials and Its going to be sheltered.
 

sorce

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If you have loose materials around the side, it seems easier for the core to compact and miss water entirely. Or stay too wet......

But yeah, I wouldn't listen to me!

Sorce
 

Brian Van Fleet

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Ahhhh...didn't see that you'd already repotted it once, and into potting soil+perlite. I'm confident your shimpaku could have made it another season in Brent's soil. I bought this one from him in 2010. At that time, he sawed it out of a wooden box, shipped it, and I slip-potted it into a big mica pot. 4.5 years later, and I still haven't repotted it; probably won't until next year.

If you want to repot yours a second time this season, in its weakened condition, I'd suggest you throw it away instead and save yourself the trouble. 11 times out of 10, tree death is linked to roots.

Find with someone in your area who has experience and nice trees, offer to help him/her help repot their trees this weekend for some good hands-on practice. You'll learn, and people always appreciate a second set of hands.
 

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mcpesq817

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In my experience, junipers do not like wet soil. I'm not a big fan of Brent's soil in my climate, mostly because I don't have the time to check all my trees individually for water every day. So, I usually repot my trees into 100% inorganic mix and water every day.

That being said, I would not have put it into potting soil - especially being in NC, I would think that humidity plus potting soil are going to make things rough for your tree. Unless you are confident that you are able to closely monitor the moisture level in the pot every day or even twice a day, I'd think about finding the smallest pot you can, and repot it as carefully as possibly using an inorganic mix. A pond basket could work very nicely to help keep the soil dry. Don't hose off the roots, and don't disturb the roots or the foliage.

It's going to be a bit of a balancing act as if you end up losing a lot of the foliage, the roots probably won't need as much water, leading to wetter soil. At least that's been my experience. Good luck!
 

erb.75

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the biggest problem you'll have is you need to wait for the soil to dry out a little bit, but as soon as you need to water, the soil will stay soggy for an extended period of time, and then you're back to problem #1 (root rot). there is no way to really get around this with heavy organic soil, so you CAN'T really fix this problem with organic soil, especially on rainy days. People use inorganic (rocks) soil because the opposite problem (the soil drying out quickly) CAN be fixed by watering more frequently.
 

sorce

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Don't worry JoeR, our book will do ok!

Brian, I read that about the roots in the SD 2013 thread. Great Aha moment! thanks! It does ring hella true.

Sorce
 

mcpesq817

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the biggest problem you'll have is you need to wait for the soil to dry out a little bit, but as soon as you need to water, the soil will stay soggy for an extended period of time, and then you're back to problem #1 (root rot). there is no way to really get around this with heavy organic soil, so you CAN'T really fix this problem with organic soil, especially on rainy days. People use inorganic (rocks) soil because the opposite problem (the soil drying out quickly) CAN be fixed by watering more frequently.
Yep, that was my point - much more clearly articulated :)
 

JoeR

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I see this thread exploded while I was gone.

I think there is a misunderstanding. Its not straight potting soil. I sifted/screened the potting soil and perlite so there was basically only pine bark and larger particles. Its about a 65%-35% ratio of perlite to screened potting soil. I'm not that noobish ha.

It drains at the same rate as brents. It is almost the same ratio and particle size as his, too.

Today was the first time it went two days without raining so that's something. The soil was much drier today.

Also the pot it's in is about 50% screen, 50% plastic. It has screen on the bottom and all sides.
 

JoeR

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If you have loose materials around the side, it seems easier for the core to compact and miss water entirely. Or stay too wet......

But yeah, I wouldn't listen to me!

Sorce
Oh yes this I knew. My houseplants do that...

I was more of saying slip pot it into similar soil but into a colander.
 
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