Shohin Deshojo

RogersJ402

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Hi all,

I'm fairly new to this forum, have been reading and loving the the community input.

One of my favourite trees is my Shohin Acer palmatum (pic attached).

I'm looking to do a Deshojo the same, however there seems to be a lack of Shohin Deshojo(is there a reason for this?)

I've attached a pic of my Deshojo. Which Im considering to Shohin down the line ( I'm undecided).

Any pics of Shohin Deshojo for inspiration you could share please?
 

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Leo in N E Illinois

Imperial Masterpiece
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I have no direct experience with 'Deshojo'. I recall reading that it is not as vigorous and is more disease prone than unnamed seedling Japanese maples. If I recall correctly, Anthracnose, if it is a problem in your area, 'Deshojo' is rather susceptable. I'm fairly sure if you look long enough you will find shohin size 'Deshojo'. I do know it has more typical growth pattern (typical in terms of being similar to the wild or normal Acer palmatum). The normal growth pattern for Japanese maples lends itself better to medium size trees as bonsai. Most of the "champion show trees" are in the 18 to 36 inches tall range. This is the size range where you don't have to fight with internode lengths and leaf size quite as much.

The 'Hime' type dwarfs, sometimes called princess types, these Japanese maples have much shorter internodes, shorter leaf petioles, smaller leaves and overall make better shohin size bonsai. For example 'Koto Hime' and 'Hime Shojo' and others.

But you can do just about anything, any style, any size with Japanese maples, they do submit to bonsai techniques better than most trees.
 

james

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To get to your inspiration tree, you will to do several things. Trunk thickness and taper needs to be increased. This is done by leaving one/two sacrifice branches which are let to grow freely all year. You want them to grow several feet tall or more. In so doing, you need to remember these sacrifices branches will be removed. Their sole purpose is to thicken you base. Next, you need to consider your intended trunk line. You want taper (no reverse taper) and movement. About 1/3 the way up your tree, you have the main leader and two heavy branches coming off at same location. If all let to grow freely, this will swell. It sounds drastic, yet 2 of these may best come off (at some time). If all three grow unchecked, the swelling from growth, and the scar once removed may be larger that current base (reverse taper). Lastly, you want to start several of the lower branches. Don't let them get thick. Just don't chop them all off because they look strange. You want short intenodes for these branches. The internodes you currently have on lower branches are several inches long. Buds are forming at their base, and can be used to make your lower branches.
 
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