Short Terra Cotta Training Pots

edro

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Where do the lower profile terra cotta pots come from?
I usually see them in pictures and articles from Japan.

I have not seen them for sale in the states and can't even find them online at the typical bonsai resources.

Are they much more abundant in Japan?

Thanks!
 

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Edro--azalea pots and/or bulb pots are the name these go by and are available at most regular nurseries and home improvement stores. No need to buy them at a bonsai nursery. Save that trip when they're ready for it;)

I prefer plastic pots myself because they eliminate the problems of low-fire clay pots; namely that the clay isn't completely vitrified when low-fired and the clay pot absorbs moisture and holds it too long when wet conditions (rainy) persist. And when weather turns hot and dry, the pot sucks moisture from the roots and requires additional watering. This can make watering difficult when weather conditions are changeable. If you use plastic, you're not fighting the pot. Plus, low-fire terra cotta pots can crack easily if they are frozen when wet. Hope you can make sense of what I'm trying to say
 
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IIIROYIII

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i purchased mine at bonsaimonk

you may have to call to get them however, I've never seen them on the website.

I think weetree may have better prices on them, but i didn't want to deal with shipping
 

edro

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Cool, thanks for the replies!

I also didn't really think about the wicking power in summer.
Is it really that much worse than standard unglazed pots or wooden grow boxes?

I make wooden grow boxes now, but I thought about using these terra cotta pots because the wooden boxes are horrible looking after a few months. Maybe I should stop using cheap scrap pine, but their cost is why I use them.

These terra cotta pots are just as cheap and look a lot better.
I guess I could use mica pots too.
 

ovation22

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The pots from Japan (and Wee Tree) are high fired, don't wick water, and are less likely to crack than the normal terra cotta pots from garden centers. That said, if protected from hard freezes they can (and from experience do) last longer.
 

nip

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Is there some sort of coating that could be placed on the outside of the pots to prevent wicking? My pots are already drying out fast
 
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Not to distract Edro... but that isn't your tree is it? It's Rob's isn't it? (aka. october)

V
 

Klytus

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Yes there is a substance that can be painted on to prevent wicking,it's the glaze applied prior to firing.

These glazed halfpots when available to buy in the British Isles all seem to originate from South East Asia and have a creamy oatmeal coloured clay,one or two large drainage holes and rustic glazes.

I suspect container loads arrive in many diverse ports.

Usually they have a name vaguely Indochinese or somesuch,good for Bulb,Cactus,Bonsai and even Primula.

I suspect beeswax or pine resin could be used to interupt wicking,but it's a guess.

Garden Centers must be restocking so now's the time to strike.
 
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