Should I give up on my Japanese Quince? It is sick, help needed.

Clicio

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After one year caring for this Chaenomeles in training, and having fought against spider mites during the end of the summer, I am lost to why it is still behaving badly this winter.
It bloomed in Autumn.
It didn't drop its leaves in the Fall.
Leaves are losing their green color, chlorosis like. They should only get chlorosis in a very dry alkaline soil, which is not the case here.
There are microscopic black points under the leaves, *but they don't move*, and under a loupe they look like...small points.
There are also microscopic white featherlike fuzz, *but they also don't move*.
I took it out of the plastic pot and roots are OK, healthy white tips, no galls, not circling, not dead.
Now in Sao Paulo the Spring came early this season, and instead of waking up and showing new growth, the Quince is wilting and looking bad.
I have tried to identify a possible fungal issue, with no success. Even a paper on the subject is confusing:
If anyone could help me out with suggestions and possible causes for its behaviour i am very much obliged.
Pictures below:

Last Spring, blooming:
01.jpg

As it is now, today:
02.jpg


Leaves, top:
03.jpg


Leaves, bottom:
04.jpg



Leaves, closeup:
05.jpg
 

Paulpash

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Is there a Winter where you are? I thought they'd need a Winter to be happy? They are the most cold tolerant plant I've ever grown - flowers in - 8C temps. The few leaves never get frosted off. Just spit balling here...
 

Clicio

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The few leaves never get frosted off. Just spit balling here...

Well, perhaps they are not so happy as in their natural environment, but yes, they grow and flower and get old here, even being zone 11.
This one (and others from different growers) perhaps are already adapted to our not so cold winters.
Prunus Mume, Zelkova, the Maples, all in my garden dropped their leaves.
But not this quince.
Thanks, Paul.
 

0soyoung

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I think you just need to be patient - those tired leaves will fall off when the buds break. Flowering may not happen until after that or maybe not at all this year.


I wonder if I've got this right 🤔.
You should too, @Clicio - stay with it until it definitely has stopped ticking.
 

Clicio

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I think you just need to be patient - those tired leaves will fall off when the buds break.

Ah, some hope in your answer!
I know very well plants don't care about wall calendars, but fact is Spring should officially start only on Tuesday, September 22. Which means one and a half months away.
But the pine buds are swelling, the Umes are full of new growth, and so on.
Weird.
Thanks!
 

JudyB

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From the appearance of the moss on the soil, I would suggest you take care with this staying too wet. They do like to dry out somewhat between waterings. I agree that patience will show you what you have in another month...
 

Clicio

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From the appearance of the moss on the soil, I would suggest you take care with this staying too wet.

Yes, you are right.
As you may well know...
One of the methods of getting rid of the spider mites is spraying the plants, specially the undersides of the leaves, with a water jet every other day.
And water always end up being absorbed by the soil.
Fall and Winter are our dry seasons, even so I guess I could be exaggerating on the watering.
I will be patient and water a tidy less.
Thanks, @JudyB !
 

leatherback

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For me, the non-japanese quince (!) do not drop their leaves all winter, unless it gets really cold. I think theis one also is just hanging onto them till spring.
 

Clicio

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Hi Clicio . It looks like spider mite .
Hello, thank you @Sno .
Yes, I guess they did come back...
Unfortunately.
I will follow a new recipe to see if it works, and will update this thread for good news or bad news.
:rolleyes:
 

Driftwood

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Apart of pest and fungi control I'm not too worry about my chaenomeles speciosa any more, I does funny things like flowering literally in any month! Leafing in the middle of winter or dropping leaves in summer (I do watered often) but it fruited without leaves 🤪. I think it's a very tough plan but weird in the sense as Ryan Neil explained, it japan they called Boke which means to forget or forgetfull.. But It can also mean stupid, unaware, clueless or I will say to make us feel clueless!
 

Clicio

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Driftwood said:
...in Japan they are called Boke which means to forget or forgetfull.. But It can also mean stupid, unaware, clueless or I will say to make us feel clueless!

Yes, Boke.
Clueless.
Makes sense!
😂
 

Clicio

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Well, many here helped pinpoint the problem, and Spider Mites it is.
Special thanks to @Sno and @Cadillactaste and Adam Lavigne for positively identifying it.
So I asked around, and the Dutch flower grower experts in Brazil sent me a recipe, as below:
1 spray of diluted Neem oil, alternating with 1 spray of pepper emulsion, every three days.

To make the pepper emulsion:

1-) Chop 3 pieces of garlic with a mix of strong raw peppers.
Blend well in a mixer with ¼ gallon of alcohol vinegar.
Let it rest for 1 week (better 10 days).
I have used Mexican red jalapeñas and Brazilian malaguetas.

02.jpg

2-) Dissolve ¼ of a natural bar soap in ¼ gallon of hot water.
I used Coconut soap, easily available here.
Reserve and let it cool down.

03.jpg

3-) Filter the pepper emulsion and mix 5ml of it with the soapy water.
Spray under the leaves alternating with Neem oil.
Below the aspect of the emulsion before being mixed:

04.jpg

I am trying it and will post the results here in two weeks,
IF THE PLANT SURVIVES!
😂😂😂😂😂😂
 

Kadebe

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Well, many here helped pinpoint the problem, and Spider Mites it is.
Special thanks to @Sno and @Cadillactaste and Adam Lavigne for positively identifying it.
So I asked around, and the Dutch flower grower experts in Brazil sent me a recipe, as below:
1 spray of diluted Neem oil, alternating with 1 spray of pepper emulsion, every three days.

To make the pepper emulsion:

1-) Chop 3 pieces of garlic with a mix of strong raw peppers.
Blend well in a mixer with ¼ gallon of alcohol vinegar.
Let it rest for 1 week (better 10 days).
I have used Mexican red jalapeñas and Brazilian malaguetas.
I guess the Mexican spider mites will love this recipe :p
 

Clicio

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I think you just need to be patient...
You should too, @Clicio - stay with it until it definitely has stopped ticking.

I am patient, or at least I try to be.
But after losing a quince to the mites, I don't want to just sit and watch them destroying my bonsai.
So I have decided to take action; if it dies, then it will be my fault and not fate...
 
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