Should the roots of this Brazilians Rain Tree be exposing like this?

still_but_living

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Got this from the nursery yesterday, but noticing the roots look a little different than other BRT bonsais I found online, they seem exposed above soil?

Not sure if I am over panicking because I do see some yellowish leaves.


Thank you for your input.
 

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Paradox

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A few yellow leaves are not a reason to panic. However those roots above the soil could be a problem if there aren't many in the pot. Also, the soil looks dry and some of the leaves are closed (this could also be caused if you recently moved the tree before taking the picture). BRT do not like to dry out completely. It looks like it was potted in gravel. That won't hold a lot of moisture. Or are the rocks just on the top?

If there are lots of roots in the pot, I wouldn't worry too much about it
 

jonfromchicago

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Are you sure those are roots? Looks like spaghnum moss to me. I could probably just not be seeing the roots you're talking about. If some roots are sticking out above the soil, it'll be fine, the roots will get air pruned and new growth will redirect back down. I have a lot of BRTs and I even have a BRT forest. Sometimes BRTs will yellow in some areas and shed old leaves or you may have low humidity at home. Try your best to keep the humidity high above 60% and keep the soil moist.
 
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Arnold

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What soil is under that gravel?I always see those trees with the moss and the gravel but whats under there? xD
 

still_but_living

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A few yellow leaves are not a reason to panic. However those roots above the soil could be a problem if there aren't many in the pot. Also, the soil looks dry and some of the leaves are closed (this could also be caused if you recently moved the tree before taking the picture). BRT do not like to dry out completely. It looks like it was potted in gravel. That won't hold a lot of moisture. Or are the rocks just on the top?

If there are lots of roots in the pot, I wouldn't worry too much about it
its just rocks on top of soil, it is still sort of wet, not sure if the nursery was watering too much to cause the yellow or its maybe normal.
 

still_but_living

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Are you sure those are roots? Looks like spaghnum moss to me. I could probably just not be seeing the roots you're talking about. If some roots are sticking out above the soil, it'll be fine, the roots will get air pruned and new growth will redirect back down. I have a lot of BRTs and I even have a BRT forest. Sometimes BRTs will yellow in some areas and shed old leaves or you may have low humidity at home. Try your best to keep the humidity high above 60% and keep the soil moist.
yea i am not sure at all as i'm new to all this, but moss seems very likely. the humidity is more than 60% as I placed a humidifier next to it.
 

rockm

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Those are not roots. It's sphagnum moss. I would scrape off all those pebbles on the soil surface to see what the actual soil looks like and to see what's up. Care will be based on what that soil is, not on the pebbles on top, as those are cosmetic, not horticultural.
 

still_but_living

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Those are not roots. It's sphagnum moss. I would scrape off all those pebbles on the soil surface to see what the actual soil looks like and to see what's up. Care will be based on what that soil is, not on the pebbles on top, as those are cosmetic, not horticultural.
This is the soil beneath the rocks, seem moist when touching.
 

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rockm

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This is the soil beneath the rocks, seem moist when touching.
That soil is not just moist. It is soggy. It's something to keep an eye on. It can't stay that wet for the tree to remain healthy. Indoors, the tree is not going to use as much water as it will outside.

Indoors, you will have to keep a constant eye on how and when you water--water when the tree needs it, not when you feel like it. BRT can't dry out, but they also can't stand constantly soggy soil. Watering is the hardest part of bonsai to master for all. It isn't an easy thing to learn and relies on temperature, light, humidity, etc. Needs differ day-to-day. Yellow leaves are a sign the tree is having to adjust to something, from being moved from a greenhouse to inside a house--that move has altered light, water and air circulation needs. The tree will likely continue to drop leaves as it tries to adjust...

All trees should be kept outdoors when possible, including tropical plants like this one. You don't say where you are located, but in general, tropical trees do best when kept outside from late spring to late summer (from the time springtime temperatures are consistently above 50 and into fall when average temps start dipping in the high 40's).

It's possible to keep some tropicals inside, but it's not easy. Extremely low light (and no, artificial "grow" lighting is inadequate, unless you invest in high-output LED, Halide, etc systems).
 

still_but_living

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That soil is not just moist. It is soggy. It's something to keep an eye on. It can't stay that wet for the tree to remain healthy. Indoors, the tree is not going to use as much water as it will outside.

Indoors, you will have to keep a constant eye on how and when you water--water when the tree needs it, not when you feel like it. BRT can't dry out, but they also can't stand constantly soggy soil. Watering is the hardest part of bonsai to master for all. It isn't an easy thing to learn and relies on temperature, light, humidity, etc. Needs differ day-to-day. Yellow leaves are a sign the tree is having to adjust to something, from being moved from a greenhouse to inside a house--that move has altered light, water and air circulation needs. The tree will likely continue to drop leaves as it tries to adjust...

All trees should be kept outdoors when possible, including tropical plants like this one. You don't say where you are located, but in general, tropical trees do best when kept outside from late spring to late summer (from the time springtime temperatures are consistently above 50 and into fall when average temps start dipping in the high 40's).

It's possible to keep some tropicals inside, but it's not easy. Extremely low light (and no, artificial "grow" lighting is inadequate, unless you invest in high-output LED, Halide, etc systems).
Yea seems like it is too wet, and I do have a 6500k full spectrum LED light hanging above the tree, hoping that can do the trick. I live in a condo so no direct sun light without a glass barrier (the balcony doesn't get any sun).
 

Carol 83

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Yea seems like it is too wet, and I do have a 6500k full spectrum LED light hanging above the tree, hoping that can do the trick. I live in a condo so no direct sun light without a glass barrier (the balcony doesn't get any sun).
So this will be a totally indoor tree? BRT's really enjoy their spring/summer outside.
 

Paradox

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I've kept BRT indoors full time for 18 months with no problems. Not sure how well they do long term but supposedly they can do ok if you give them enough light
 

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