SHOW AND TELL

f1pt4

Chumono
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Did you repot it? Wire it? Style it? Build it?

Post your photos here!!

Photos posted here are not for critique purposes. If you would like feedback on a particular project, please start a separate thread.

This is our show and tell thread.


Have fun and enjoy!


*EDIT* 04/03/20 - IF YOU POST PHOTOS HERE, AND YOU ARE NOT A TORONTO BONSAI SOCIETY MEMBER, PLEASE MENTION IT IN YOUR POST
 
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sorce

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Dug 2 years ago.
In the ground at the house for one.
Dug and potted last spring.
Just pulling it out for New Growth thread photos, but it found its way here.

20200319_142801.jpg

Hacked after.

Sorce
 

f1pt4

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@leatherback @Forsoothe! @sorce

Thanks for posting these. I should have been a little bit clearer with this thread, as it was set up with haste and I didn't make it clear from the get go.

It's a bit of a learning curve.

In these threads within the Toronto Bonsai Society page, we are hoping they will be used by TBS members as a supplemental space to connect, ask questions, and share photos, when we're not meeting in person. Of course members are welcome to post in the general forum as well, but if they have something to share with the TBS community specifically, that's what this Toronto Bonsai Society page is for.

If you're not a TBS member, please make it clear in the post! As to not make it confusing for people reading!

Once again sorry for the confusion everyone!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
 
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Jkhuu

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Sharing some pics on work started on this Jack Pine (novice so feedback will be valued). Did some initial styling/wiring and the works during this self isolation. Will resume in the years to come. Stay safe everyone !!! John Khuu
 

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Lifaholic

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That's a really nice progression! The last image image really shows a very strong direction. :)
 

AnthonyB

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That's a really nice progression! The last image image really shows a very strong direction. :)
Agree, I like what you are doing with that JP John. How are you doing the carving on the large jin?
 

AnthonyB

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Thanks again. The Jins and carving was done with 2 power tools I have. A angle grinder and a die grinder with left over 1/4” router bit I had.
I have not yet pulled the trigger on power tools for carving but have been thinking on it for a while. I am considering doing some trunk carving on this Hornbeam but don’t want to kill it.
AD8655C8-E402-48F8-A2C8-4F34EE92E32C.jpeg
 

Jkhuu

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Amazing HB btw. I would go with the dremel or die grinder. I have used it on 4 trees so far and some of the bits are inexpensive imo...that will do the job.
 

AnthonyB

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Ok not sure if these count for show and tell as I’m well aware they are NOT BONSAI (and not even sticks in pots) ... but I’ve been having fun with growing things from seed over the winter and couldn’t resist potting up a couple, esp since I found a producer in Japan making small wood kiln fired pots, and also my kids were asking me for ‘little trees’ they could take care of.

E3DF4A9F-F265-47C2-9BEF-36232CDCF85D.jpeg

Jacaranda mimosifolia chosen because the angle of the ‘trunk’ seemed perfect for pot.

5963C467-ECD1-4E54-9A72-11BCDDFD3F48.jpeg
This was one of the Bolusanthus speciosus (Rhodesian tree wisteria) sprouts i got coming up that seems like it is a dwarf variety. The tray in the background below shows a few of the regular variety that sprouted st the same time for comparison ...

AE710C80-CE30-4288-802E-E0F0A817E536.jpeg

These two below were for my kids ...

3F749286-8F45-4862-8D11-18A93327DF60.jpegRight is a Sweet Gum (Liquidambar styraciflua) that came up with a kink at the base of the trunk (=> slant style planting) and left are a trio of Casuarina cunninghamiana that we’re originally both taller and 5 in number before one of my cats got at them on the window sill. Still not sure how only two were removed but the three left are now growing back and this time with ramification since the primary growth tips were expertly snipped off.

6005FB68-C082-4FFB-9BB7-A801A30E6F60.jpeg
And then this is just some beautiful moss I found walking thru the Don Valley that i thought might look good in this pot. I also stashed a few sumac seeds in there so we’ll see if there is more to it later in the summer :)
 

AnthonyB

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Amazing HB btw. I would go with the dremel or die grinder. I have used it on 4 trees so far and some of the bits are inexpensive imo...that will do the job.
Thanks, I bought that at the TBS spring show last year. It was a tree developed by Arthur Skolnik (which is why I am nervous about putting it in danger, am mindful of his legacy).
 

Jkhuu

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I understand and knew him from the club some 20 years ago. I also have one of his pines which I really appreciate. I myself question many times whether I try to develop it further or risk letting it deteriorate if I didn’t work on it, etc. But if this pine flourishes and does well I will be very stoked ! It’s a personal choice ofcourse and test it on another tree first : )
Btw wanted to share this pic of a honeysuckle I carved. This was done on a 1/4” router bit and die grinder combo. It was my first crack at it.
 

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leatherback

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but have been thinking on it for a while. I am considering doing some trunk carving on this Hornbeam
Why? Why would you do any work on this trunk? Lovely as is! Please do not use this is a practice tree, and better.. Do not carve it at all..

Been transplanting seedlings..
bonsai_20200410_21.jpgbonsai_20200410_24.jpg
 

AnthonyB

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Why? Why would you do any work on this trunk? Lovely as is! Please do not use this is a practice tree, and better.. Do not carve it at all..
I haven’t decided whether to ultimately take that approach or not. There are some issues with the main trunk and I have mapped out a potential carving plan that might deal with the reverse taper in an appealing way and a way that would augment to the sense of age that the tree already has. But like I said, I have not decided to go down that road for a variety of reasons. Certainly I would never consider using it as a practice tree (!!!)
 

Lifaholic

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I myself question many times whether I try to develop it further or risk letting it deteriorate if I didn’t work on it, etc.
Hey John,

I've been looking at the book the Montreal Botanical Garden published last year and compared the trees I could recognize from their older publication from 1985. About 35 years between the two, so you can see some differences in the trees: what made it and what didn't. The Asymetry Podcast where Ryan interviews David Easterbrook, the original curator of the MBG, is an interesting insight into the preservation work on trees and the fine line between making them their own, the best interests of the trees, and their role as conservationists at the MBG. They don't want to infuse these trees with their own personal vision - that's what their personal collections are for. They try to maintain the vision of the original creators.

That being said, you're in a different position. Not a curator, but you did inherit a legacy tree. Should you continue the vision Arthur had long ago, or should you take it in your own direction? I feel the answer is dictated by two things. Firstly, the tree will sometimes make these decisions for you (just as some of the trees at the MBG). Also, you are now the owner of this bonsai, and I feel it's important that you put your own, timely stamp on it. The styles and trends with bonsai and penjing come and go, and today's vision of what is a good bonsai should be differs from what it was in decades past.

Take, for instance, the pinus sylvestris Aaaron K. put in the TBS 2019 Spring show (http://torontobonsai.org/galleries/2019-spring-show-trees/#prettyPhoto[]/28/). The tree looked so different before he started working on it. There's a photo of it in one of the older editions of the BCI magazine. The trunk was more vertical, the branches were all straight, and it looked like a pyramid. It felt very static, and yet it was considered one of the club's more important trees. What a difference a generation makes?

I say find your own vision for the tree and work on it :) Hopefully you'll also put it into one of our shows so we can see what you did :)
K
 

Jkhuu

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Thank you K. Very eloquently summarized. I have the end goal in mind but nothing too drastic so far though other than applying the bonsai principles to get the tree towards tip top health...
 
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