Siberian Elm air layer

PiñonJ

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This tree has gone full autumn on me. All interior leaves have turned yellow. Leaves at the branch tips are still green. It never lost turgidity. What do you think @0soyoung, is it stealing resources from the foliage to grow roots? I had it under an apricot tree the first week, do you think it wasn’t getting enough sunlight?
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Hartinez

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This tree has gone full autumn on me. All interior leaves have turned yellow. Leaves at the branch tips are still green. It never lost turgidity. What do you think @0soyoung, is it stealing resources from the foliage to grow roots? I had it under an apricot tree the first week, do you think it wasn’t getting enough sunlight?
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0soyoung

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is it stealing resources from the foliage to grow roots?
The leaves are the resource.

I would guess roots are drowning. At any rate, as roots die they produce an ethylene precursor. Lots of things can happen, but among them is that leaves behave as though fall is coming. Most commonly it happens when roots become anoxic (are drowning).

As you know, too little light and leaves will also yellow and drop. Were this the case, the green leaves you still have would conform to a pattern of shadows that exist where you have them. It looks to me that leaves at the branch tips are the only ones that are still green - hence my guess = don't water quite so frequently.
 

PiñonJ

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The leaves are the resource.

I would guess roots are drowning. At any rate, as roots die they produce an ethylene precursor. Lots of things can happen, but among them is that leaves behave as though fall is coming. Most commonly it happens when roots become anoxic (are drowning).

As you know, too little light and leaves will also yellow and drop. Were this the case, the green leaves you still have would conform to a pattern of shadows that exist where you have them. It looks to me that leaves at the branch tips are the only ones that are still green - hence my guess = don't water quite so frequently.
I didn’t notice until this morning, a couple of terminal buds have opened and it looks like all the buds on the tree are getting ready to push. You can see on the lateral bud in the photo a little greenish-white tip. Do you think all the yellowing was just preparation for abscission and pushing new leaves? I didn’t think I was drowning the tree, but it’s in straight akadama, so I couldn’t be as sure as I would be with pumice.
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0soyoung

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Quite possible, just an odd time.

As long as new leaves emerge, harden, and stay green, there is nothing to really worry about, IMHO. Most likely, new leaves will only appear at the end of the shoot, of course, and a little ramification may occur (you know, normal stuff).
 

PiñonJ

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Quite possible, just an odd time.

As long as new leaves emerge, harden, and stay green, there is nothing to really worry about, IMHO. Most likely, new leaves will only appear at the end of the shoot, of course, and a little ramification may occur (you know, normal stuff).
Here's a quote of yours from another thread:
"You didn't mention anything about having applied rooting hormone or not. Using one that is too concentrated can cause the foliage to go through the motions like it is fall. With acer palmatums this will make the leaves turn very red like they do in fall."
I freshened up the callus where there were no roots and applied IBA 0.1%. So not very concentrated, but do you think that had something to do with the leaf change?
 

0soyoung

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I freshened up the callus where there were no roots and applied IBA 0.1%. So not very concentrated, but do you think that had something to do with the leaf change?
I don't.
Were it 1% IBA, maybe.
4.5%, definitely.

Do you still think those buds are pushing?
 

PiñonJ

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It’s been slow, but more of the buds are swelling and showing some green.
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0soyoung

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The buds are definitely cracked, but they are not pushing very fast and its getting late ...
My thoughts are that you've got some working roots (buds are released by cytokinin>auxin during the season) AND it may require extra winter protection. Dunno, but that's what crosses my mind right now.

Think about how you might shelter it this winter and keep watching for now. Maybe zone 5/6 BNutter will chime in about this; @Leo in N E Illinois, maybe.
 

PiñonJ

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The buds are definitely cracked, but they are not pushing very fast and its getting late ...
My thoughts are that you've got some working roots (buds are released by cytokinin>auxin during the season) AND it may require extra winter protection. Dunno, but that's what crosses my mind right now.

Think about how you might shelter it this winter and keep watching for now. Maybe zone 5/6 BNutter will chime in about this; @Leo in N E Illinois, maybe.
There seems to be steady bud movement all over the tree, some areas faster than others. I think the pace is about to pick up. In any case, I was counting on giving it very good winter protection the first year.
 

leatherback

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In the very first picture of this thread I was thinking: This guy will never get enough roots on the tree for the size of the plant. I think this is what you are seeing.

You do have enough roots to keep it alive. However, you chopped a THICK trunk and messed with the 'waterways' in all sorts of manners. Tree needs a season to sort this out, ensure all is provided with water and nutrients while needing to build new roots and covering up that huge gaping hole in its feet.

Leave it alone. Water as normal, letting the soil go slightly dryish between watering, as you would with any tree. Come spring, I would expect it to leaf out normally.

We are clearly past the peak of summer, days are starting to shorten and trees will feel the dilemma of ... Do I push more, or will I go dormant.

I am not too concerned. But then again.. No siberian elms in my garden and not in zone 6B.
 

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