Skinny old procumbens .... problem/s ??

Mike Corazzi

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This was a mounded staked procumbens 25 years ago.
I whacked it back to about what it looks like now. Was a fairly big dense moppy thing.

P1040968.JPG

It's just not "thrivey."
I've read here that junipers like to be potbound so this spring when I repotted (well draining) I figured to just let it be and see if
it decides to fill the pot and get happy.

It may not be.

P1040966.JPG

P1040967.JPG

Had new growth early spring. Mainly at top. Foliage at ends of twiggy twigs. No pesky crotch budding. Not much activity at all. Still green. Mostly.

Any suggestions?

????
 

Wires_Guy_wires

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Have you done any pinching or tip removal?
It feels like it happened. No judgement.
My procumbens looked roughly the same last year because I did. This year it bursted with life and I'm waiting out for the spring flush to consolidate before I start hacking again.
They need those growing and extending tips to get dense foliage behind them and to keep the branches alive.
Might be a strategy worth to consider.
 

Mike Corazzi

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Might indeed, WGW. I did do that but thought not enough to matter. Only a few wild ones at the toppish part.
Not on those sparse twiggys lower. :(
 

sorce

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I'm starting to think the trees are getting the High Life and you're drinking the water!

I'm gonna start a program to trade all your trees out for healthy ones! TF!

Maybe....

WWWW G WWWWWW.

Sorce
 

Mike Corazzi

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I'm starting to think the trees are getting the High Life and you're drinking the water!

I'm gonna start a program to trade all your trees out for healthy ones! TF!

Maybe....

WWWW G WWWWWW.

Sorce
Can you make it in the form of a STIMULUS ???
I likes me some stimmulatin' 🥴
 

Mike Corazzi

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Fertilize, full sun, no pinching.

Those “pesky crotch growths” ARE the back budding!
It doesn't seem to get them in the lower 2/3 anyway. Those low hanging skinnys don't do much of anything.
 

Mike Corazzi

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Too drastic????

P1040968.JPG


Hmmmm... 🐌




The cow butt would have to stay. :D
 
Last edited:

Adair M

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Too drastic????

View attachment 302496


Hmmmm... 🐌




The cow butt would have to stay. :D
Ok, here’s my advice: you need to thin out the top. Using scissors. Only cut where the wood is brown. If it’s green, don’t cut there. Go back farther.

The idea is to not have any green foliage below the woody (brown twigs) supporting it.

Look at my juniper below: (I know, it’s not a procumbens, but all junipers are worked in a similar manner)


9D4A6FA3-AD37-41CB-915C-0070ABCDD1D9.jpeg
If you notice, all the green is above the brown twigs. The twigs look like fingers holding up the foliage from below.

You don’t want “hanging foliage”. If it hangs below the main branch, cut it off.

This should greatly reduce the amount of foliage in the canopy. It’s especially important to do this on the upper regions of the tree.

See how you can “see thru” the canopy of my tree? You want this. John Naka used to call it “so the birds can fly thru”, but what we’re really after is sunlight shining thru. A solid canopy is real pretty, but ultimately very unhealthy for the tree. A solid canopy blocks all the sun light, preventing the back buds, and takes all the sunlight for the lower branches.

That’s why I don’t pinch! Pinching the canopy builds a solid circumference. What we’re REALLY after is a pierced circumference, but when you step back, the holes appear to disappear. And the best way to do that is thin by cutting out tufts of foliage, cutting off entire little tufts where the wood is brown.
 

Mike Corazzi

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Ok, here’s my advice: you need to thin out the top. Using scissors. Only cut where the wood is brown. If it’s green, don’t cut there. Go back farther.

The idea is to not have any green foliage below the woody (brown twigs) supporting it.

Look at my juniper below: (I know, it’s not a procumbens, but all junipers are worked in a similar manner)


View attachment 302499
If you notice, all the green is above the brown twigs. The twigs look like fingers holding up the foliage from below.

You don’t want “hanging foliage”. If it hangs below the main branch, cut it off.

This should greatly reduce the amount of foliage in the canopy. It’s especially important to do this on the upper regions of the tree.

See how you can “see thru” the canopy of my tree? You want this. John Naka used to call it “so the birds can fly thru”, but what we’re really after is sunlight shining thru. A solid canopy is real pretty, but ultimately very unhealthy for the tree. A solid canopy blocks all the sun light, preventing the back buds, and takes all the sunlight for the lower branches.

That’s why I don’t pinch! Pinching the canopy builds a solid circumference. What we’re REALLY after is a pierced circumference, but when you step back, the holes appear to disappear. And the best way to do that is thin by cutting out tufts of foliage, cutting off entire little tufts where the wood is brown.
Thank you. EXCELLENT info.
Plainly explained and easy to see.
The picture is invaluable.

Good on ya, adair. :)
 
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