Snake Bark Maple Seeds?

Dermot

Sapling
Messages
37
Reaction score
22
Location
Ireland
Hi all.

I have a snake Bark Maple sitting in the garden for a few years. I just noticed that it looks like it's making seeds at the moment. Does anyone know if these snake Bark Maple seeds copy the parent plant? Or are they more generic like acer palmatum?
 

Attachments

  • IMG_20220423_174448.jpg
    IMG_20220423_174448.jpg
    136 KB · Views: 14
  • IMG_20220423_174444.jpg
    IMG_20220423_174444.jpg
    303.4 KB · Views: 14

HorseloverFat

Imperial Masterpiece
Messages
9,100
Reaction score
12,973
Location
Northeast Wisconsin
USDA Zone
5a
I think "snakebark" is not a species.. but a more common genetic deviation amongst Acers in general. (QUITE POSSIBLY only some)...(I may not be right)

This would mean(if I WAS correct) that while being slightly more prone to this variation... it is not a guarantee... some Acers will "lean" harder toward varying attributes.

It would be helpful to know what actual species it is.. or if Snakebark IS a species and I'm just a doofus..

Read up and get back to us!

🤓
 

Dogestoevsky

Sapling
Messages
45
Reaction score
78
Location
Southeast Wisconsin
USDA Zone
5b
In my experience "snakebark maple" is another name for acer pensylvanicum, the striped maple. Others call it moosewood, or as I like to call it, nature's toilet paper.
 

Eckhoffw

Omono
Messages
1,704
Reaction score
2,604
Location
St. Paul Mn.
USDA Zone
4b
Wiki. Acer pensylvanicum, known as the striped maple, moosewood, moose maple or goosefoot maple, is a small North American species of maple. The striped maple is a sequential hermaphrodite, meaning that it can change its sex throughout its lifetime.

Acer pensylvanicum
Moosewood leaves.jpg
 

Dermot

Sapling
Messages
37
Reaction score
22
Location
Ireland
Thanks for all the replies. It does look like a Pensylvanicum. The leaves are far too large for bonsai. I was considering giving it away to free up space but the seeds had me wondering what the future might hold if I was to hold onto it.
 

0soyoung

Imperial Masterpiece
Messages
7,247
Reaction score
12,196
Location
Anacortes, WA (AHS heat zone 1)
USDA Zone
8b
AFAIK, ALL maples produce samara regardless of the state of flower pollination. If the flowers were not pollinated, the seeds will not have an embryo and will be hollow. Further, I believe that self-pollination is extremely rare - that is pollen from another tree of the same (or very closely related) species.
 

HorseloverFat

Imperial Masterpiece
Messages
9,100
Reaction score
12,973
Location
Northeast Wisconsin
USDA Zone
5a
AFAIK, ALL maples produce samara regardless of the state of flower pollination. If the flowers were not pollinated, the seeds will not have an embryo and will be hollow. Further, I believe that self-pollination is extremely rare - that is pollen from another tree of the same (or very closely related) species.
Whoah, 0so!... I JUST saw your AHS.. Dang! I'm 2 or 3 depending which direction I spit.

Without looking (just KNOWING 'WA'), I'm gonna guess INNER WA... like high elevation?

🤓
 

0soyoung

Imperial Masterpiece
Messages
7,247
Reaction score
12,196
Location
Anacortes, WA (AHS heat zone 1)
USDA Zone
8b
Without looking (just KNOWING 'WA'), I'm gonna guess INNER WA... like high elevation
On an island surrounded by 50 degree salt water. My garden sits roughly 50 feet above MASL.
It rarely gets much above 70F because of it. If it weren't for a 7 -10 days of a NE wind blowing down the Frazier River Valley in BC, it would never freeze in my garden either.
Very boring.

BTW, just clicking on my location (below my avatar) will open Google maps and show you where I am (similarly for any BNutter)..
 

Similar threads

Top Bottom