So, my deshojo maple died :(

Amerssa

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I always loved maples, they are not really common here in my country, and i knew it would be a hard species to take care in my region, but it actually went pretty well until this summer, wich was way hotter than usual, and it really felt the heat, all the leaves burned from the intense sun (even though i live in a apartment), also i missed some watering days during this period, wich is probably the main reason it died, but before trying to grow more maples, i want to study even more the species. Would love some recommendation on any good content about maples.(videos, books, blogposts, etc.) Specially Deshojo wich is my favorite. :)
 

NOZZLE HEAD

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My condolences.

I like to play with species that are native to my area and uncommon as bonsai, as a plus they are free, or really inexpensive if you have to go to a nursery.

If I moved to Brazil I would try to find species there (cuz you have more native plants than the rest of us combined) that bonsai well.
 

Shibui

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There is a reason why Japanese maple are not common in Brazil!
You can read as much as you like. Reading will not change the fact that maples are temperate species and just do not like growing in the tropics.

There are so many great species that will thrive in the tropics and make great bonsai. At some stage everyone comes to realise there is no point flogging a dead horse (or maple)
 

ajm55555

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There is a reason why Japanese maple are not common in Brazil!
You can read as much as you like. Reading will not change the fact that maples are temperate species and just do not like growing in the tropics.

There are so many great species that will thrive in the tropics and make great bonsai. At some stage everyone comes to realise there is no point flogging a dead horse (or maple)
She knows that: "I knew it would be a hard species to take care in my region". I think she's experimenting.
 

Kanorin

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Maybe a trident maple might be worth trying?
 

caerolle

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Deshojo is a really sensitive variety. You easily get sun burns even in temperate regions.
Which is kinda weird considering Vertrees say 'sun' for 'Deshojo' and 'any' for 'Shin Deshojo.' My understanding has been that these are sensitive to sunburn in very hot weather/intense sun, but they seem more sensitive than I thought. I say this based on my experience with some little trees of the similar 'Shin Shishio' cultivar, which Vertrees say are 'any' wrt sun. I had a bad experience with these a few days ago, even this early in the year, and even though they did not get afternoon sun, and have now moved them in the shade. I wondered if it was because they are so young and tender, but am beginning to think they are also more delicate than I understood them to be.
 

caerolle

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Maybe a trident maple might be worth trying?
I wonder about a Hedge Maple. Aren't those supposed to take extreme heat far better than the Japanese Maples? Not helpful if strictly a Japanese Maple is wanted, but at least it would be a maple...
 

ajm55555

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Which is kinda weird considering Vertrees say 'sun' for 'Deshojo' and 'any' for 'Shin Deshojo.' My understanding has been that these are sensitive to sunburn in very hot weather/intense sun, but they seem more sensitive than I thought. I say this based on my experience with some little trees of the similar 'Shin Shishio' cultivar, which Vertrees say are 'any' wrt sun. I had a bad experience with these a few days ago, even this early in the year, and even though they did not get afternoon sun, and have now moved them in the shade. I wondered if it was because they are so young and tender, but am beginning to think they are also more delicate than I understood them to be.
I don't have burn issues with the young leaves but with the older ones when the sun starts getting hot.
It could also be the wind. I'll try to protect my tree a bit more and we'll see if it makes a difference.
 

Rivian

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Been growing my deshojo in full sun all day everyday, no leaf damage. I think there could be some truth to it being too harsh sunlight in extreme climates, but mostly people just dont water properly and then blame it on the species or environment.
 

Paradox

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Been growing my deshojo in full sun all day everyday, no leaf damage. I think there could be some truth to it being too harsh sunlight in extreme climates, but mostly people just dont water properly and then blame it on the species or environment.

There is a BIG difference between full sun in Germany and Brazil.
 

leatherback

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@Clicio has Japanese maples, I think even a deshojo in Sampa. Maybe ask him for pointers.
It is struggling for him too. Lack of proper dormancy and the prolonged heat are rough on them.
 

Clicio

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First, @leatherback thanks for inviting me to this thread.
@Shibui thanks but that is not true. Curiously I have some Japanese books on bonsai, by Japanese authors, that state in the most definite way "don't try pines or maples in south america, it is impossible".
No, it is not impossible. Pines thrive here and many bonsai growers, specially in the south and higher terrain, grow beautiful maples in Brazil, Argentina, Chile.
@Amerssa bem vinda ao fórum, you can write me directly if you wish, in Portuguese if it helps.
I have been trying to grow maples in São Paulo for three seasons
I found out that:.
- Tridents thrive no matter what.
- Japanese Maples have to be protected from direct sun AND wind in our summer; they can dryout in a matter of hours, so, plenty of water is necessary.
- Kotohimes and Kyohimes are a little more delicate, but grow well.
- Deshojos are a challenge though. They start the season beautifully, but after the summer they look like coming back from the war.
So my advice is open shadow during the whole summer, plenty of water, no wind, keep the ambient humid in the winter as ours are very dry (like the Japanese winters, less the snow).
Some examples of MY trees:

Japanese maple:
20190621_155946.jpg

Kotohime in the winter:
20200731_125819.jpg

Kyohime in the Spring:
20180916_103912.jpg

Trident in the Spring:
20190412_164827.jpg


Deshojo:
20190128_170922.jpg


So, don't give up.
Patience, shadow, humidity and watering proper!
Boa sorte com seus Áceres!
 

Clicio

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Of course there are Bill Valavanis videos and books, difficult to find but worth it.
Talking about books, besides Valavanis this one below I like most when talking about Maples.

Screen Shot 2020-07-31 at 17.20.31.jpg
 

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